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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Archive for June, 2018

The Five Families of Stainless Steel

June 28th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

At Skolnik we offer a host of steel containers — our stainless steel drums offer an ideal solution for products requiring the purity, compatibility and strength of stainless steel. But just like Skolnik offers different families of products, there are different families of stainless steel. Five to be exact: austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, martensitic stainless steel, duplex stainless steel and precipitation hardening stainless steel. The families are classified by their crystalline structure.

 

Austenitic stainless steel is the largest family. About two thirds of all stainless steel produced falls into this category. Their crystalline structure is achieved by alloying with sufficient nickel and/or manganese and nitrogen. These stainless steels maintain their microstructure at all temperatures so they can’t be hardenable by heat treatment, but can be strengthened by cold working to an extent.

Austenitic stainless steel is great for formability and weldability, they are also essentially non magnetic. They’re often used for tanks, containers, storage vessels, architecture and the like.

 

Ferritic stainless steel has a structure more similar to carbon steel, contains between 10.5% and 27% chromium with very little or no nickel. Due to the chromium structure, ferritic stainless steel also holds its structure at all temperatures and is not hardenable by heat treatment. However, they are magnetic and are problematic to weld.

Welding creates microstructural problems so ferritic stainless steel is not used in the construction of large, heavy walled vessels and tanks and structures.

 

Martensitic stainless steels form a family that can be heat treated to provide the adequate level of mechanical properties. Martensitic stainless steels are magnetic and are less corrosion resistant than ferritic and austenitic due to a lower chromium content.

However, their high carbon content enables them to be significantly hardened so they are commonly used for knives, razor blades, cutlery and tools.

Duplex stainless steel’s structure is a combination of that of austenite and ferrite, usually at a 50/50 or 40/60 mix. It’s characterized by high chromium and molybdenum with lower nickel contents. The mixed microstructure results in higher resistance to chloride stress corrosion.

Duplex stainless steel can be difficult to weld properly, but can sometimes be a cost-effective solution for chemical processing, transport and storage, and marine environments.

 

Precipitation hardening stainless steel has corrosion resistance comparable to austenitic varieties but can be hardened to even higher strengths than martensitic steel. Precipitation hardening stainless steel is often used for gears, valves and other engine components, nuclear waste casks, and other pieces in aerospace and other high-tech industries.

 

Beyond that, there are over 150 grades of stainless steel.

Skolnik stainless steel drums are available in a variety of gauges and sizes and are stainless types 304 and 316, both austenitic, and 409, a ferritic stainless steel. And our products are built thicker, heavier and stronger than industry standards require.

 

Sleep it off…in a Barrel Room!

June 26th, 2018 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: Cool Stuff, Skolnik Newsletter

Readers of the Skolnik blog know that we offer news and topical stories effecting the dangerous goods community and the wine industry. However, in this piece, we believe we have found the common ground between both markets! Check out the Matices Boutique Hotel located in Tequila, in the State of Jalisco in Mexico. The hotel recently opened about 25 unique rooms that are designed from the shape of a Tequila barrel!
barrel hotel
The rooms are designed to look like barrels in which the distilled agave product is left to rest — and become reposado — or to age. The idea is for guests to sleep inside the barrels and become like Tequila! This brings a new meaning to “Sleeping it off!”
The idea of the barrel style hotel started when the owner of La Cofradia distillery opened a conventional hotel about 10 years ago. The hotel was successful and he wanted to try a new innovative concept to attract guests, hence the barrel shaped rooms. The rooms are decorated in the rustic style, are located near the distillery, and offers its guests Tequila samplings, tours to the nearby City of Tequila, and a chance to make a clay bottle. The hotel has plans to eventually offer 50 barrel rooms.

Photos of the Barrel Rooms

The website for the Matices Hotel.

Overpack Salvage Drums not Recommended for Primary Shipment

June 25th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Salvage Drum

Salvage drums have long been used as overpacks for the efficient and effective transport of damaged, defective or leaking containers. However, according to the DOT, salvage drums are NOT to be used as a secondary container, or overpack, for a primary shipment.

Rather, an overpack salvage drum should only be used for damaged, defective, leaking or non-compliant packagings that are discovered after having been placed in transportation.

In 1998, the ‘T’ Salvage drum became the United Nations’ recommended salvage packaging for international use. It is most commonly an 85 US gallon capacity. To bear the UN certification, overpack salvage drums are rigorously tested. They must be able to be dropped 1.2 meters (4 feet) on its most critical orientation without leaking and pass a 30 kPa overall Leakproofness Test. However, while they are certified to hold non-compliant packages in transport, the DOT recommends that, once overpacked in a salvage drum, a non-compliant container should be routed to a facility for disposal or re-containment. You can never be too careful.

And remember, traditional overpack drums are designed to protect non-leaking containers or to be used in a combination pack, they are not certified to hold damaged/non-compliant containers.

PHSMA launches HAZMATICS

June 19th, 2018 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Industry News, Skolnik Newsletter

Recently, the DOT’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) launched the HAZMATICS portal for shippers of dangerous goods classified contents. The Portal allows a shipper to log in and complete the Form DOT 5800.1 Hazardous Materials Incident Report. The Portal is a ‘One Stop Shop’ where industry, modal, state and other business partners can access PHMSA services via the internet, creating a single source for crucial Hazardous Materials and Pipeline Safety data via single sign-on access.
There are HAZMATICS video tutorials which are not publicly available on YouTube at this time. However, they are imbedded in the User Manual Incident Reporting Guide on the HAZMATICS landing page within the Portal. If you have not yet created a user account within the Portal, this link will take you to instructions on how to sign up. The link also, includes instructions on how to view the HAZMATICS video tutorials. These instructions are located towards the bottom half of the page.