1-800-441-8780

1-773-735-0700

Industrial Packaging for Critical Contents

Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Archive for the ‘DOT/UN’ Category

The Basics of UN Drums

July 13th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN

Proper packaging is crucial, especially for dangerous goods. Using the wrong container to transport or store your goods can have a disastrous impact on your facility, community, employees and the environment. With countless manufacturers and transportation companies across the globe building and utilizing industrial containers everyday, there needed to be a level of regulation and oversight in the packaging and transportation industry. One of those levels of regulation comes from the United Nations.

For a drum to be UN approved and rated it needs to be built, tested and certified to contain liquid or solid dangerous materials. Only packages that are certified to have passed the UN packaging standard tests may be used to transport dangerous goods.

A few basics on UN drums and the regulations that surround them:

UN drums are tested against drop, stack, leak and pressure standards. UN performance standards are an internationally recognized system of ratings for solids and liquids.

All UN certified drums are marked with a code that indicates the physical nature of the product for which they are suited. This code always starts with the letters “UN” in a circle. This marking is permanent.

There are three dangerous goods packing groups. The first (packing group I) refers to UN Drums and barrels such as those manufactured by Skolnik. This packing group is built to the highest standard.

It is the shipper’s legal duty to select and fill packages correctly. It is also the shipper’s duty to ensure that packages are marked accordingly. Shipping container packers should check that packages are properly marked and, if they are not, should not transport them. But the responsibility of proper selection falls on the shipper.

Do you know what UN rating your materials need? Skolnik can help you understand the UN ratings and guide you to the packaging suited for your use. What’s more, Skolnik UN drums are built stronger and thicker than the industry standards require.

PHSMA launches HAZMATICS

June 19th, 2018 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Industry News, Skolnik Newsletter

Recently, the DOT’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) launched the HAZMATICS portal for shippers of dangerous goods classified contents. The Portal allows a shipper to log in and complete the Form DOT 5800.1 Hazardous Materials Incident Report. The Portal is a ‘One Stop Shop’ where industry, modal, state and other business partners can access PHMSA services via the internet, creating a single source for crucial Hazardous Materials and Pipeline Safety data via single sign-on access.
There are HAZMATICS video tutorials which are not publicly available on YouTube at this time. However, they are imbedded in the User Manual Incident Reporting Guide on the HAZMATICS landing page within the Portal. If you have not yet created a user account within the Portal, this link will take you to instructions on how to sign up. The link also, includes instructions on how to view the HAZMATICS video tutorials. These instructions are located towards the bottom half of the page.

No Torque Wrench, No Compliance!

May 29th, 2018 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, Skolnik Newsletter

By now, most shippers of dangerous goods know that following Closure Instructions for UN certified packagings is a must in order to have a compliant package. Having a non-compliant package, one that is not closed in accordance with the Closure Instruction, can put the shipper at risk for sizeable fines from the US-DOT. One of the steps in the Closure Process of a Salvage Drum or any Open Head, Bolt Ring style steel drum, is to:

TIGHTEN THE BOLT — with a calibrated torque wrench while using downward pressure on the cover and hammering the outside of the ring with a non-sparking dead-blow mallet to further seat the ring. Continue tightening and hammering the ring until the torque stabilizes at 55 – 60 ft-lbs and does not decrease when further hammering on the ring circumference is performed. Ring ends must not touch. (Effective 25 September, 2006 and in accordance with CFR 178.2(c), we have revised this procedure to use torque as the most effective closure requirement.

With a specific torque range specified, the shipper must be able to confirm that the closure meets this requirement. Closure without a calibrated torque wrench would result in a non-compliant package (unless the shipper has an alternate means to confirm the torque). When DOT inspectors visit shipper facilities, they will ensure that packaging manufacturers, fillers and shippers comply with Performance Oriented Packaging requirements specific to each packaging manufacturer. To confirm the measured torque, DOT Inspectors will expect shippers to have a recently calibrated Torque Wrench, and calibration certification in use when closing drums prior to shipment.

If a shipper chooses not to use a Torque Wrench, a Level-Lock Closure Ring is an alternative closure option. The Lever-Lock Ring does not require a Torque Wrench for a compliant closure.

Click here to see the written and video instructions of the Skolnik Closure Instructions for the Bolt and Lever-Lock Rings.

What’s that embossment mean??

May 22nd, 2018 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, Skolnik Newsletter

When a packaging has passed its performance test criteria, markings indicate the performance rating and test information specific to the certification test. This information must be applied in accordance with CFR 178.3(a)(3). For drums over 100 Litres (26 US Gallons) there are a number of ways that the marking can be applied including stamping, embossing, burning and printing and there must be one complete set of durable marks on the side or non-removable top head, and a second partial mark embossed permanently on the bottom head. The purpose of having the two marks is that once filled, the drum will sit, primarily, on its bottom head, and the UN test information will be readily viewable for the user at the side or top mark. The permanent partial bottom mark must conform to the application options indicated earlier. However, the side or top mark is required to be durable rather than permanent. Therefore, it is common and acceptable for the durable mark to be printed on the drum, or on a self adhesive label which is attached to the side of the drum. The characters on the label and the permanent embossment are subject to the size and sequence requirements as specified in 178.3(4) and 178.503(a)(1) through (a)(6) and (a)(9)(i).

Skolnik.com offers a unique breakdown of the individual marks by drum style. Click any of these links to understand the marking code: