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Archive for the ‘HazMat’ Category

Labelmaster’s DGS draws nearly 300!

September 17th, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: HazMat, Industry News, Skolnik Newsletter

Last week (September 4-6, 2019) at the Sheraton Grand in Chicago, Labelmaster’s 14th Annual Dangerous Goods Symposium (DGS) rocked!. Known as the preeminent conference of dangerous goods trainers, shippers, packagers, manufacturers as well as Federal Regulators, the 2019 Symposium broke the attendance record! A gathering of the most prominent industry leaders and presenters provided insights and practical advice to help navigate the most common, and many complex, DG issues. The agenda included a well-rounded list of relevant topics, including:

  • Creating a Culture of Safety
  • Domestic & International Regulatory Updates
  • Virtual Reality in Training
  • Drone Delivery
  • Carrier Variations
  • Lithium Battery Recycling and Regulations

Some of the the speakers and workship leaders included Peter Mackay of Hazardous Cargo Bulletin, Air Canada’s David Bolton, Nick Carlone of Cargo Publications, Mike Hoysler of FedEx, Geoff Leach of The Dangerous Goods Office LTD, Tim Rogers from UPS, Steven Webb of PHMSA and Pete Wagner of Purolator. Most memorable was Vinnie Desiderio from USPS who conducted a live telephone interview with his mother, a typical shipper who would benefit from hazmat training!

The Symposium highlight was a social night of dueling pianos at Howl at the Moon.

Thank you to everyone at Labelmaster for putting forth a tremendous effort to make DGS-14 a valued global event!

New Regulation for Lithium Battery Manufacturers and Distributors

August 3rd, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Industry News, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

There is a new requirement for lithium cells and batteries that has the potential of creating a huge wave within the dangerous goods community within the next 2 years. This requirement is known as the “UN 38.3.5 Lithium cell and battery summary” that can be found in the “Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods Modal Regulations Volume II twentieth revised edition”. In paragraph 38.3.5 it states, “the following test summary shall be made available”. The question becomes “made available to whom”? The intent of the paragraph was meant to mean that the 38.3 test summary be made available by manufacturers and subsequent distributors of lithium cells and batteries to regulatory enforcements officials. The test summary refers to the UN 38.3 testing that is conducted on all new lithium batteries.

The testing on these batteries ensures that batteries are in a condition for transport that ensures that the batteries travel safely through the logistics chain. The testing and subsequent documentation also ensures that counterfeit batteries that have not been tested stay out of the logistics chain. According to 38.3.5 the information that “shall” be provided in the test summary include:

  • Name of cell, battery or product manufacturer, as applicable;
  • Cell, battery or product manufacturers contact information to include address, phone number, email address and website for more information
  • Name of test laboratory to include address, phone number, email address and website for more information
  • A unique test report identification number
  • Date of test report
  • Description of cell or battery to include at a minimum;
    • Lithium ion or lithium metal cell or battery
    • Mass;
    • Watt-hour rating or lithium content
    • Physical description of the cell/battery; and
    • Model numbers
    • List of tests conducted and results (i.e., pass/fail)
  • Reference to the assembled battery or testing requirements, if applicable (i.e. 38.3.3 (f) and 38.3.3 (g));
  • Reference to the revised edition of the Manual of Tests and Criteria used and to amendments thereto, if any; and
  • Signature with name and title of signatory as an indication of the validity of information provided. Lithium Cell and Battery Test Summary Challenge with change.

As with most changes that occur with the regulations, the challenge will be communicating the correct application of this rule to shippers, freight forwarders to ensure that there is an understanding that this document is not necessary for transport. Comprehensive and consistent training is an easy way to ensure that the requirement for this document is understood and implemented correctly. Remember, the document is meant to be made available to enforcement officials that need to refer to it should there be an incident involving a lithium battery shipment.

Easy HazMat Training Options to Remain Compliant

July 30th, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: HazMat, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

More than ever before, improper or non-existent training is being viewed as the major cause of many dangerous goods incidents happening today in the US and abroad. A large percentage of the DOT‘s enforcement actions pertain to the failure of employers to provide appropriate hazardous materials training. In most cases, violations are the result of no function-specific training, or no recurrent training which is required every 3 years. We recommend that employers use outside consultants to establish and monitor the efficacy of a training program. An outside consultant can choose appropriate testing requirements, administer testing and track ongoing compliance. This includes training for new employees as well as re-training for employees that receive additional responsibilities.

While many training programs are available, Labelmaster offers face to face, classroom programs that are recognized as being of particularly high quality. Check here to learn more about these options.

For on-line training, Labelmaster also offers 9 critical courses that are essential for dangerous goods shippers and employers. These classes (https://www.labelmaster.com/shop/training) are easy to administer, can be attended from anywhere in the world, and are available 24/7.

Whether face to face or electronically, there is no reason for HazMat employers to overlook their training responsibilities.

PHMSA Announces Advisory Committee on Transportation of Lithium Batteries

June 18th, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) announced on May 9th, 2019, that it is soliciting nominees for a new Lithium Battery Safety Advisory Committee, in accordance with Section 333(d) of the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018. “The Department is seeking experts from diverse technical and transportation backgrounds to evaluate safety improvements for the transportation of lithium batteries,” said U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao.

The Committee will provide a forum for the Department to solicit stakeholder input to continually strengthen the safety of multimodal lithium battery transportation. PHMSA is seeking nominations from across the transportation and manufacturing industries to participate. Further, the Committee will advise the Department on developing policy positions for international forums and on how to increase awareness of the importance of lithium battery safety requirements. The Committee will submit their findings to both the Secretary and Congress. For further information, see the announcement as posted to the Federal Register. Nominations must be submitted within 21 days of the Federal Register publication date.