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Archive for the ‘HazMat’ Category

Labelmaster’s 13th Annual Dangerous Goods Symposium Breaks a Record!

September 18th, 2018 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: HazMat, Industry News, Skolnik Newsletter

September 5-7, 2018 — Labelmaster hosted a record breaking 350 attendee’s at it’s annual Dangerous Goods Symposium in Rosemont, IL. DGS is an opportunity for members of the Dangerous Goods and Hazmat communities to gather and exchange information about the ever-changing DG regulations in the US and abroad. In addition, DGS also focuses on DG compliance, training, new technologies and all the matters that relate to safe transportation of dangerous goods.

This year, featured speakers came from all around North America including the US and Canada, Europe, Australia, South America and more. The list of speakers included representatives from the US DOT Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), a cadre of domestic and international training organizations, and a host of private manufacturing companies. The conference included both lecture and workshop-style presentations and included excellent opportunities for networking and meeting others in the DG community. Planning ahead, the 14th DGS is planned for September 4-6, 2019 at the Sheraton Grand Hotel in Chicago.

Thank you Labelmaster, for helping to make the transport of dangerous goods safer, every day!

Who is Liable? Hazardous Material Drums and Storage

August 9th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat

You can never be too careful when dealing with hazardous waste, especially when discarding it. Businesses whose work produces hazardous waste as a byproduct must store it properly onsite in hazardous waste drums or other certified containers until it can be removed by hazmat professionals. While the waste is onsite at their business it’s their responsibility, and any mishaps would be blamed on them. However, once the waste is finally taken away to a storage site, these businesses remain in a tenuous situation. Despite the fact that the waste is no longer on their property or within their care, these business owners can still be held liable if something happens at the storage site.

As stipulated in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) there are four reasons a business can get in trouble for their hazardous waste:

  1. Hazardous wastes are present at a facility
  2. There is a release, or possibility of a release of these hazardous substances
  3. Response costs have been or will be incurred
  4. The defendant is a liable party

In addition, there are four classes of liable parties:

  1. Current owners and operators of a facility
  2. Past owners and operators of a facility at the time hazardous waste had been disposed
  3. Generators and parties that arranged for the disposal or transport of the hazardous substances
  4.  Transporters of hazardous waste that selected the site where the hazardous substances were brought.

Based on these regulations, businesses who hire others to dispose of their hazardous waste can still be found liable for regulations broken by a completely separate party.

Our advice is to do extensive research about prospective hazmat partners. Look into storage quality, trustworthiness of disposal company, and longevity of both. Find hazardous waste drums that are reliable and durable and a partner company who knows their stuff, so you can feel confident that your materials are being stored properly and you won’t get hit with penalties later.

Can Ice Cream be a HazMat!

July 17th, 2018 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: HazMat, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

The shipping of ice cream can be classified as a dangerous good, or hazmat for transport if it’s packed in dry ice. As a result of the dry ice, the shipment becomes a hazardous consignment as dry ice evaporates over time releasing carbon dioxide gas. Normal air is 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen and only 0.035% carbon dioxide. If the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air rises above 5%, carbon dioxide can become toxic.

By using the correct amount of dry ice it is possible to meet the stringent requirements of maintaining a specific maximum temperature within a package during its transport period. The precise amount required will depend on many factors, including; the insulating properties of the box, the mass of goods to be maintained at temperature, the starting temperature of the goods, the arrangement of the goods and dry ice within the packaging, the climatic conditions during the transport period, the length of the transport period, and the allowance made for possible delivery delays.

Most importantly, consult with your shipping agent to confirm that your dry ice shipment is compliant and safe.

PHSMA launches HAZMATICS

June 19th, 2018 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Industry News, Skolnik Newsletter

Recently, the DOT’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) launched the HAZMATICS portal for shippers of dangerous goods classified contents. The Portal allows a shipper to log in and complete the Form DOT 5800.1 Hazardous Materials Incident Report. The Portal is a ‘One Stop Shop’ where industry, modal, state and other business partners can access PHMSA services via the internet, creating a single source for crucial Hazardous Materials and Pipeline Safety data via single sign-on access.
There are HAZMATICS video tutorials which are not publicly available on YouTube at this time. However, they are imbedded in the User Manual Incident Reporting Guide on the HAZMATICS landing page within the Portal. If you have not yet created a user account within the Portal, this link will take you to instructions on how to sign up. The link also, includes instructions on how to view the HAZMATICS video tutorials. These instructions are located towards the bottom half of the page.