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Industrial Packaging for Critical Contents

Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Archive for the ‘Safety’ Category

A DOT Quiz — TRUE or FALSE!

August 15th, 2017 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

Take a few minutes and answer True or False to the following statements about compliance with the DOT regulations:

  1. The transportation of hazardous materials exclusively on private property, to which signs, gates and guard stations prevent public access, is not subject to the Hazardous Materials Regulations.
  2. If a carrier is present during the time of unloading and the motive power is still attached to the transport vehicle when an incident occurs, the carrier is responsible for submitting an incident report per CFR 171.16. If the carrier has dropped the transport vehicle and the motive power is removed from the premises, the carrier obligation is fulfilled and transportation is ended; thus, the hazardous materials incident reporting would not apply.
  3. Employees subject to hazardous materials training must be tested for general awareness/familiarization, function specific and safety training in accordance with CFR 172.704. In addition, recurrent training must cover these three primary areas of knowledge. Therefore, an employee must successfully pass initial hazardous materials training in addition to recurrent training. Recurrent training cannot be waived.
  4. If a hazardous material at ambient temperatures meets the definition of a solid under CFR 171.8 when packaged and offered for transportation, it is a solid material. However, if the solid will likely encounter temperatures in transportation that may cause the material to become a liquid, then the packaging must be capable of containing the hazardous material in the liquid state.

The UN System for Dangerous Goods Packaging

August 10th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Safety

Skolnik steel barrels are all UN tested for their contents/purpose. If a manufacturer or shipper fails to comply with UN standards, they could face hefty fines, litigation and more. It is always important for manufacturers to adhere to UN regulations, but for dangerous goods packaging the stakes are even higher because, in addition to a fine, failure to comply with UN standards for dangerous goods packaging could lead to a spill, disaster or contamination. But what does this mean? How does the United Nations affect packaging regulations?

The UN system for dangerous goods packaging is universally used and recognized. The system is used to classify, package, mark and label dangerous goods to facilitate their safe transport. All national and international regulations governing road, rail, sea and air transport are based on the United Nations’ system. With all manufacturers, suppliers and transport professionals following a single set of rules, the chances of contamination are greatly reduced.

The regulations dictate a minimum standard of performance. These performance standards are based on the intended contents of a package. Packages must exceed these standards before they can be authorized to contain and transport dangerous goods. The UN system starts with a sort of checklist of general criteria and specifications that the design of packages must meet. The packages then undergo rigorous physical testing before receiving UN certification.

At Skolnik, we pride ourselves in consistently engineering and manufacturing steel drums that exceed the UN certification criteria for dangerous goods and other uses. Our industrial packaging is designed and tested to be thicker, heavier and stronger than the industry standard, and our dangerous goods packaging is no different.

Gasket Positioning is Critical

August 8th, 2017 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

For a steel drum, the closure system is the key to successful transport and storage.

By far, one of the most critical components of a proper drum seal is the gasket. Since the adoption of Performance Oriented Packaging Standards (POPS) in the mid-1990’s, new gasket styles, materials and profiles have entered the market to increase drum integrity and performance. Gaskets today can vary by density, contour, color and composition. However, with all these variations, drum fillers must be aware that all gaskets need to be inspected prior to sealing or closing a drum. Whether it‘s the first time closed, or a repeated closure, check the gasket for any irregularities including, but not limited to: crumbling, cracking, slicing, tearing. Confirm that the gasket is properly seated into the cover groove or on top of the bead. Check if the bond to the metal is intact, and does the gasket exhibit memory (bounce-back when compressed). In the event that a user believes that the gasket to be used is questionable, contact the original equipment manufacturer for a replacement gasket. It is important that replacement gaskets be the same as the original gasket with which the drums were UN tested. Using a different gasket will void the UN certification of the drum.

Need a visual? Watch the Skolnik Closure Instruction Videos for Bolt and Leverlock drums.

Improving Railroad Safety is a Success

July 25th, 2017 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

The Federal Railroad Association (FRA) established the Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) to provide advice and recommendations to the FRA on railroad safety matters. The RSAC is a formally chartered and structured Federal Advisory Committee and provides a forum for collaborative rulemaking and program development. RSAC consists of representatives from all of the agency’s major stakeholder groups, including railroads, labor organizations, suppliers and manufacturers, and other interested parties. RSAC’s achievements are many. Since the establishment of RSAC, rail accidents per million train miles are down by nearly 30 percent as total miles and passenger counts increased significantly. Because of broad industry collaboration through committees like RSAC, success happens.

The past 20 years have proven that industry and government can accomplish much when they work together toward a common goal (i.e., developing rulemakings, regulations and safety policies, advancement of technologies and more importantly, saving lives today and tomorrow across our great nation moving forward). RSAC is one tool that FRA and its partners use to advance safety, and we need every effective tool to improve safety.

Check out the railroad safety facts and statistics here!