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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Archive for the ‘Safety’ Category

What to Consider When Choosing a Dangerous Goods or Hazmat Drum

January 31st, 2017 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

When it comes to steel drums, it is important to know that the container you choose was designed and approved for your intended use. This is especially important when it comes to hazardous materials or waste. Just as there are a wide range of hazardous materials: explosives, gases, flammables, peroxides, infectious, radioactive, corrosive, etc; there are a wide range of hazmat drums. First, a shipper must determine whether or not the contents to be shipped is hazardous or non-hazardous. To make this initial determination, a shipper can consult with the US DOT, or a dangerous goods consultant. If it is determined that the contents is a regulated hazardous material, then the next step is to consider packaging options that will be complaint with Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The regulations specific to steel drums are in chapter 178.601.

Consider asking a dangerous goods consultant to determine the level of risk associated with your materials. Are they flammable? Do they produce toxic fumes? Is it an oxidizer? How does it react to water? Does it pose a threat to the environment? All of these characteristics could impact what linings, closures, fittings and materials you should consider when choosing a container. They also impact how your containers should be stored. For example, in case of a spill or leak, oxidizers should be kept separate from any flammable or combustible chemicals. In case of a fire, you’ll want to know how your materials react to water or other fire suppressors. Once you’ve found the appropriate container, keep your materials in their designated containers at all times, and always have a plan for possible leak or emergency situations. We suggest having Salvage Drums on hand to quickly encase any unexpected release of contents.

Every Skolnik steel drum was engineered for specific uses and are tested in accordance with the United Nations Recommendations. We are happy to help guide you to the appropriate packaging for your hazardous materials classification, and can even suggest resources to help you better understand, and comply with the hazards of your materials and/or how to properly dispose of any hazmat.

If you are not sure whether or not you are shipping, mailing, or in any way transporting a hazardous material, we have made special arrangements with Mr. Gene Sanders, of W.E. Train Consulting in Tampa, FL to address these questions. At no initial charge, Gene will assist Skolnik customers, and potential customers, for up to 15 minutes, to determine if the product they are shipping is a regulated product and thereby subject to the shipping requirements of the CFR. If it is a regulated product, Gene will then charge to assist in package selection and determinations of documentation requirements. The small upfront cost for properly shipping hazardous materials can save huge penalties for violation of these regulations. To contact Gene Sanders, you can reach him directly at: 813-855-3855 or gene@wetrainconsulting.com.

Know your Linings

December 13th, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Safety

Carbon steel and stainless steel each possess properties that make them perfect containers for specific materials without any modification. But, for some materials, especially in the pharmaceutical, chemical and food industries, a drum lining is necessary. Lining is often required as a safety precaution, to meet the strict regulations of government agencies, and/or because the contents or environment would be contaminated without it. Even as a precaution, lined steel is a necessary measure to preserve the integrity of the materials, container, facility, handlers and the environment.

The most common lining for a lined steel drum is a phenolic coating. Phenolic linings provide a chemical protection between contained materials, such as food, and the metal of the drum. The phenolic is mixed with an epoxy to give it extra flexibility – this prevents it from cracking if the drum undergoes any damage. Skolnik lined carbon steel also includes a rust inhibitor to remove surface oil prior to lining. The upper tolerance for Skolnik’s epoxy phenolic lining is about 550 degrees Fahrenheit, after which the coating could become brittle and compromised.

A rust inhibitor will prevent flash rust on our unlined/uncoated drums, but if a customer needs a long-term rust resistant drum or a drum that can safely contain chemical materials, an unlined drum will not suffice.

Skolnik lined steel drums are available in a variety of different shapes, sizes, materials and lining compositions. We recommend talking to one of our sales representatives if you have any questions about your container needs, lining needs or your materials compatibility with linings.

What to Consider When Choosing Hazardous Waste Containers

November 17th, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat, Safety

When it comes to containers, it is important to know that the container you choose was designed and approved for your intended use. This is especially important when it comes to hazardous materials or waste containers.

Just as there is a wide range of hazardous materials: explosives, gasses, flammables, peroxides, infectious, radioactive, corrosive; there are a wide range of hazardous waste containers. Knowing your materials and their characteristics is an important component of hazmat safety.

First, a shipper must determine whether or not the contents to be shipped is hazardous or non-hazardous. To make this initial determination, as hipper can consult with the US DOT or a dangerous goods consultant. If it is determined that the contents are a regulated hazardous material, then the next step is to consider packaging options that will be compliant with Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The regulations specific to steel drums are in chapter 178.601.

Consider asking a dangerous goods consultant to determine the level of risk associated with your materials. Are they flammable? Do they produce toxic fumes? Is it an oxidizer? How does it react to water? Does it pose a threat to the environment? All of these characteristics could impact what linings, closures, fittings and materials you should consider when choosing a container. They also impact how your containers should be stored. For example, in the case of a spill or leak, oxidizers should be kept separate from any flammable or combustible chemicals. In the case of a fire, you’ll want to know how your materials react to water or other fire suppressors. Once you’ve found the appropriate container, keep your materials in their designated containers at all times, and always have a plan for a possible leak or emergency situations.

One of the most common uses of Skolnik steel drums is in their use in managing the safe transportation and disposal of hazardous waste materials. Every Skolnik steel drum was engineered for specific uses and jobs. We are happy to help guide you to the appropriate packaging for your hazardous materials or waste, and can even suggest resources which help you better understand and comply with the hazards of your materials.

How Airlines Are Enforcing the Ban on the Samsung Galaxy Note 7

November 15th, 2016 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Industry News, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

Last month, the DOT banned all Samsung Galaxy Note7 phones from airplanes. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), announced an emergency order to ban all Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphone devices from air transportation in the United States.
If you are in possession of a Galaxy Note 7, and are planning to travel by air as a passenger, this is what you need to know:

  1. If passengers attempt to travel by air with their Samsung Galaxy Note7 devices, they will be denied boarding.
  2. Passengers who attempt to evade the ban by packing their phone in checked luggage are increasing the risk of a catastrophic incident.  Anyone violating the ban may be subject to criminal prosecution in addition to fines.
  3. Passengers currently traveling with Samsung Galaxy Note7 phones should contact Samsung or their wireless carrier immediately to obtain information about how to return their phones and arrange for a refund or a replacement phone. Samsung has provided guidance for customers about refund and replacement options, as well as how to contact wireless carriers, at http://www.samsung.com/us/note7recall. Samsung is also answering customers’ questions at 1-844-365-6197.
  4. If an airline representative observes that a passenger is in possession of a Samsung Note7 device prior to boarding an aircraft, the air carrier must deny boarding to the passenger unless and until the passenger divests themselves and their carry-on and checked baggage of the Samsung Galaxy Note7 device. Passengers absolutely should not pack the phones in their checked luggage.  
  5. If a flight crew member identifies that a passenger is in possession of a Samsung Galaxy Note7 device while the aircraft is in flight, the crew member must instruct the passenger to power off the device, not use or charge the device while aboard the aircraft, protect the device from accidental activation, including disabling any features that may turn on the device, such as alarm clocks, and keep the device on their person and not in the overhead compartment, seat back pocket, nor in any carry-on baggage, for the duration of the flight.

Having recently flown, I have personally seen this ban enforced! View the full story here.