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Archive for the ‘Skolnik Newsletter’ Category

Crushing the Stigma of Canned Wine

September 12th, 2017 by Dean Ricker

Filed under: Skolnik Newsletter, Wine

Nielsen announced earlier this year that sales of canned wine increased from $6.4 million to $14.5 million in 2016, a whopping 125 percent jump. The same report notes that canned wine dollar sales soared 170 percent, versus a six percent increase in the more established box wine business for the same period. Melanie Virreira, marketing team leader for Ball Corporation in North and Central America, attributes the growth in canned wine consumption primarily to millennials, who continue to break patterns all over the alcohol beverage map. “What’s driving wine in can growth today is the combination of consumer trends and recognition of can advantages and capabilities,” Virreira attests. “We have a new wave of younger drinkers who are very receptive to new packaging types and unconcerned with the traditional ways of consuming their favorite beverage. Ultimately, they want to drink wine and they are asking for a package that allows them to do that where they want to and how they want to.” It’s worth noting that wine in cans is not a new concept. In 2000, Francis Ford Coppola broke ground in the industry by launching the popular Sofia Minis; sparkling wine in a can, complete with an attached pink sipping straw. Other wineries followed suit and the canned wine revolution continued. This past year, Coppola’s winery released three new versions of its well-known Diamond brand wines in cans: the Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio and Sauvignon Blanc. According to Jennifer Leitman, Coppola’s Senior Marketing VP, the growth in canned wine and response to the newest Diamond wine in cans has been “amazing,” which she chalks up to businesses successfully tracking and responding to contemporary lifestyles. “Our industry isn’t immune to larger trends,” Leitman notes. “People take their music, their entertainment, their food, their phone … everywhere. Computers are a great example. From giant desktop computers, to laptops, to smartphones and tablets. They’re getting smaller and more portable. You can work from about anywhere now … why not drink wine in more places too? Blending experiences together is big.”Virreira and Leitman will be bringing their insights and perspectives about the canned wine industry to the 2017 WIN Expo, taking place at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa, CA on November 30, in a conference session called “Canned Wine: Crushing the Stigma by Raising the Quality.” Virreira will be moderating the session and Jim Doehring, Founder of Backpack Wine Co. and Ashley Sebastionelli, President and Co-Founder of Lucky Clover Packaging will join Leitman on the panel. For more information and registration, go to: wineindustryexpo.com.

Check out the Skolnik Stainless Steel Wine Barrels here.

A DOT Quiz — TRUE or FALSE!

August 15th, 2017 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

Take a few minutes and answer True or False to the following statements about compliance with the DOT regulations:

  1. The transportation of hazardous materials exclusively on private property, to which signs, gates and guard stations prevent public access, is not subject to the Hazardous Materials Regulations.
  2. If a carrier is present during the time of unloading and the motive power is still attached to the transport vehicle when an incident occurs, the carrier is responsible for submitting an incident report per CFR 171.16. If the carrier has dropped the transport vehicle and the motive power is removed from the premises, the carrier obligation is fulfilled and transportation is ended; thus, the hazardous materials incident reporting would not apply.
  3. Employees subject to hazardous materials training must be tested for general awareness/familiarization, function specific and safety training in accordance with CFR 172.704. In addition, recurrent training must cover these three primary areas of knowledge. Therefore, an employee must successfully pass initial hazardous materials training in addition to recurrent training. Recurrent training cannot be waived.
  4. If a hazardous material at ambient temperatures meets the definition of a solid under CFR 171.8 when packaged and offered for transportation, it is a solid material. However, if the solid will likely encounter temperatures in transportation that may cause the material to become a liquid, then the packaging must be capable of containing the hazardous material in the liquid state.

Gasket Positioning is Critical

August 8th, 2017 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

For a steel drum, the closure system is the key to successful transport and storage.

By far, one of the most critical components of a proper drum seal is the gasket. Since the adoption of Performance Oriented Packaging Standards (POPS) in the mid-1990’s, new gasket styles, materials and profiles have entered the market to increase drum integrity and performance. Gaskets today can vary by density, contour, color and composition. However, with all these variations, drum fillers must be aware that all gaskets need to be inspected prior to sealing or closing a drum. Whether it‘s the first time closed, or a repeated closure, check the gasket for any irregularities including, but not limited to: crumbling, cracking, slicing, tearing. Confirm that the gasket is properly seated into the cover groove or on top of the bead. Check if the bond to the metal is intact, and does the gasket exhibit memory (bounce-back when compressed). In the event that a user believes that the gasket to be used is questionable, contact the original equipment manufacturer for a replacement gasket. It is important that replacement gaskets be the same as the original gasket with which the drums were UN tested. Using a different gasket will void the UN certification of the drum.

Need a visual? Watch the Skolnik Closure Instruction Videos for Bolt and Leverlock drums.

How to Package Sustainability

August 8th, 2017 by Jason Snow

Filed under: Skolnik Newsletter, Wine

Wineries and vineyards have worked for years to adopt more sustainable winemaking and grapegrowing practices, but the packaging that protects wine during its trip from winery to consumer is of equal importance. From closure origins to recycled paper stock and bottle weight, winery staff make dozens of decisions that affect the sustainability of wine packaging before the materials are even ordered. Next month, Allison Jordan, executive director of the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance, will lead a panel of winery supply chain and marketing professionals in a discussion about how to find the most sustainable packaging options to meet your brand’s needs. The event is part of the Wines & Vines Packaging Conference taking place Aug. 16 at the Lincoln Theater in Yountville. Joining Jordan on stage will be Ramon Ware, vice president of supply chain for Wente Family Estates; Rhonda Motil, vice president of marketing for J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines, and Mimi Gatens, marketing manager at Trefethen Vineyards. The group will tackle the subjects of light-weighting bottles, alternative packaging, closure options and the value of printing sustainable certification logos on labels. With a combined 226 years in business between them, the panelists’ three wineries prove how sustainability is a key element to success in business. Wente, for example, uses only recycled cardboard and works with soy- and water-based inks. J. Lohr recycles its packaging and operational materials including shrink wrap and wood pallets, and Trefethen was an early participant in the wine-in-kegs movement. The “How to Package Sustainability” session is just one part of the all-day Wines &amp Vines Packaging Conference. Other topics include a panel on making bottling day run more smoothly. Steve Lamoureux of The Nielsen Co. will reveal the results of a consumer-research study conducted exclusively for the conference to reveals real-life impressions of wine packaging redesigns. More sessions involve restaurant and retail wine buyers offering opinions about what sells and what doesn’t when it comes to wine packaging and consumers. The event will feature other opportunities such as free consultations with designers and the chance to vote for finalists of the Packaging Design Awards. To learn more about the conference and register, visit wvpack.com. As you prepare for harvest, make sure to check our Skolnik sustainable options for Stainless Steel Wine barrels at www.skolnikwine.com.