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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Archive for the ‘Stainless Steel’ Category

Process Drums: When and Why To Choose Them

October 6th, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

The classic stainless steel drum is used in countless industries and for an immense variety of materials. Stainless steel drums are inherently suited for materials that require security or maintained purity throughout transport or storage. They are easy to sterilize, naturally resist oxidization and corrosion and are available in a variety of styles, linings and closures to better suit the job and any UN or DOT specifications.

Nearly every industry has some need for a steel drum container. For industries where materials are being stored before and after undergoing special processes, such as food processing, pharmaceuticals, or the fragrance and personal care industries, we recommend process drums. A process drum is a stainless steel container, typically manufactured as seamless and crevice-free, that offer extreme durability, purity and comply with domestic and international regulations. These drums feature a smooth, continuous, crevice-free interior and straight sides with no hoops to help prevent bacteria build up or other contaminants that may compromise the integrity of the materials being stored or transported.

Crevice-free, stainless steel process drums are ideal for meeting high sanitary standards and Skolnik process drums are thicker, heavier and stronger than industry standards require, so you can be confident your food, chemical or personal care products are safely contained.

The Goldilocks of Containers: The 55 Gallon Drum

July 7th, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat, Stainless Steel

At Skolnik, we love engineering and manufacturing custom barrels for our clients, but while there is no one-size-fits-all container, there is a fan favorite. The 55-gallon steel drum is the most popular size container for a diverse range of industries and uses. It’s the workhorse of all containers and, just like the rest of Skolnik’s offering, it is built thicker, heavier and stronger than industry standards.

There is just something special about the 55 gallon size. It’s not too big, not too small. It’s the Goldilocks of drums, making it just right for the packing, storing and shipping of a variety of solids, liquids and even hazardous materials. It may be mid-sized, but there is nothing middle of the road about the 55 gallon container.

The 55 gallon drum is available in stainless steel, carbon steel, seamless steel and in salvage drums and stainless steel wine barrels, the closures and fittings are all customizable for your specific needs. But, while it is wildly popular, the 55 gallon may not be the best drum for you. If you are unsure or have any questions about your containment needs, feel free to call Skolnik and our team of experts will help guide you to the right container size and material your business may need.

The Many Inventors of Modern Stainless Steel

May 2nd, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

Before businesses worldwide were entrusting a Skolnik 55 gallon stainless steel drum with the shipment and storage of their most precious materials, someone had to invent stainless steel. While most people credit Harry Brearley with the discovery of stainless steel, but he was just one cog in the wheel of the invention (and definition!) of modern stainless steel.

Our journey begins in 1820 when two Englishmen, Stoddard and Farraday, and a Frenchman, Berthier, noted that iron-chromium alloys were more resistant to acids. They tried to produce higher chromium alloys to further test their discovery, but were unsuccessful.

Enter another pair of Englishmen, Woods and Clark, who in 1872 filed for the patent of an acid and weather resistant iron alloy containing 30-35% chromium and 2% tungsten. This was the first ever patent on what would, by today’s standards, be considered stainless steel. Though stainless steel was not officially defined until 1911.

The next big development, in 1875, came courtesy of another Frenchman, Brustlein. Brustlein is credited with discovering and outlining the importance of low carbon content in stainless steel – in order to create an alloy with high chromium content the carbon content must be kept lower than 0.15%. However, it wasn’t until 1895, when German scientist, Hans Goldschmidt, developed the aluminothermic reduction process for producing carbon-free chromium that the stainless steel development race truly began.

There was French scientist Leon Guillet who extensively researched iron-chromium alloys, including many of today’s models. And English Giesen who studied and published works on chromium-nickel steels while French national, Portevin, studied what is now known as 430 stainless steel.

And then, in 1911, the moment we’ve all been waiting for: German scientists P. Monnartz and W. Borschers discovered the correlation between chromium content and stainless steel’s beloved corrosion resistance. And stainless steel was finally defined.

The man often credited with the discovery of stainless steel, Harry Brearely, was a lead researcher at Brown Firth Laboratories in England. In 1912, Brearley was tasked by a small arms manufacturer with an erosion problem. Brearley set out to develop an erosion resistant steel for him, experimenting with steel alloys containing with chromium. During these experiments, specifically on August 13 1913, Brearley created a steel with 12.8% chromium and 0.24% carbon, arguably the first ever stainless steel.

Brearley’s title as “inventor of stainless steel” is greatly contested by a few americans, Elwood Haynes, Becket and Dantsizen, a polish man, Max Mauermann, and a few Swedes. Whoever is the true inventor, we and our clients want to thank them. If it weren’t for these hardworking metallurgists, researchers and scientists, Skolnik wouldn’t be able to provide our partners and customers with our expansive collection of stainless steel containers, including our crowned jewel, and most popular container, the 55 gallon stainless steel drum.

 

Small, Mighty & Handy: The 30 Gallon Stainless Steel Drum

February 4th, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

The 30 gallon drum is a perfect size for a lot of things, but the obvious is just that: it’s size. Not everything or everyone requires a 55 gallon drum. When you have a smaller quantity of materials or a tighter storage space, the 30 gallon drum is the perfect fit.

Only 30 inches tall, the 30 gallon drum is stackable and able to squeeze into small spaces safely and securely. It’s compact nature makes it especially appealing to air travel because the drum can be safely secured in a separate cabin. It’s also an ideal size container to use for next-day shipping because it’s small size is easier to handle in transit, can fit in most trucks, planes and transit vans. Not to mention it is the more economical choice for the shipper.

Small and mighty, our 30 gallon drums are composed of the same stainless steel as our larger sized drums and can be manufactured at whatever gauge your materials and use requires.