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Archive for the ‘Stainless Steel’ Category

The Powerful Properties of Stainless Steel

January 21st, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel


At Skolnik Industries, we offer a variety of stainless steel drums; in different sizes, with different closures and linings and tailored for our customers’ unique needs. Why do we offer so many different customizations of stainless steel drums? Because it’s a material greatly suited for many different uses.

By definition, stainless steel is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass. Now, we’ve talked about the unique chromium composition of stainless steel in the past, but what properties make stainless steel the powerful material it is today?

Oxidization Resistance

Chromium forms a passive protective layer when exposed to oxygen. This layer is invisible to the naked eye, but protects the metal from damage from water and air and even a degree of corrosion. The higher the chromium content, the stronger the oxidation resistance.

Acid Resistance

Stainless steel is highly resistant to acids. Obviously, this depends on the concentration of the acid and a few other variables such as the environmental temperature and the grade of stainless steel, but the natural resistance of stainless steel to acid attacks make it a strong candidate for the transport of hazardous materials.

Base Resistance

Many grades of stainless steel (the entire 300 series) are unaffected by weak bases, no matter the temperature or concentration.

Organic Resistance

Under the right conditions, specific grades of stainless steel are useful for storing and handling organics such as acetic acid, aldehydes and amines, cellulose acetate, and fats and fatty acids.

Low conductivity and magnetism

Like it’s brother, steel, stainless steel is a poor conductor of electricity and only very specific stainless steels are magnetic.
So there you have it, the primary properties of stainless steel are a recipe for a diverse array of possible uses. It’s no wonder it’s one of the most popular materials in a number of industries and one of the most common materials for Skolnik drums.

Science Vs. Steel

January 11th, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Cool Stuff, Stainless Steel

The 55 gallon industrial steel drum is the workhorse of our drum lineup. It’s the Goldilocks special: not to small, not to big, and just right for a lot of common containment needs. At Skolnik, we take great measures to ensure all of our drums are safe, strong, reliable and meet the necessary UN and DOT requirements. We work with our clients to make sure that the Skolnik drums they receive have the correct treatment, lining and closures for their particular use. Essentially, we want our drums to maintain their integrity to ensure they can work hard and last long.


That said, we appreciate the occasional science experiment, and who doesn’t like to watch YouTube videos of things getting smashed or destroyed (When you have a chance, we highly recommend watching this front load washer carnage.


A group of students put physics to the test and attempted to crush a 55 gallon steel drum on their school’s front lawn. Their destruction weapon of choice: air pressure.


Spoiler alert: they succeeded.

It wasn’t the first time someone has crushed a 55 gallon steel drum with air pressure, it wasn’t even the first time someone recorded it and posted it on YouTube, but it is still a fun and enlightening physics experiment.


As steel drum manufacturers, we have to admit that watching a beautiful barrel be destroyed hurt our hearts a little. We never claim our products are indestructible, not even our workhorse, the 55 gallon steel drum. What we do promise is that our team will work with you to discover and manufacture the best container or transport vessel for your needs and that a Skolnik container is guaranteed to get the job done safely, reliably and meet all necessary requirements.

Choosing Your Drum: Open Head or Tight Head

October 15th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, Stainless Steel

At Skolnik Industries, we provide our customers with countless options when it comes to customizing their drums. It’s crucial to us that your Skolnik steel drum is the exact fit for your needs. Among the options you’ll encounter when selecting/customizing your drum is the type of ‘head’.

There are two types of drum heads: tight head and open head. The tight head steel drum is, well, sealed tight. It has both ends seamed and no removable lid. You can only access the contents of a tight head steel drum through fittings.

An open head steel drum, however, has a removable cover and fully seamed bottom. Once you’ve determined an open-head steel drum is right for your materials, you’ll have to make more choices. First and foremost, the type of closure you desire: bolt or lever ring. And, of course, whether you require your drum to be United Nations (UN), Department of Transportation (DOT) and/or hazardous materials/dangerous goods certified. (Tight-head drums  manufactured for certification standards as well).

Open head drums are considered the best drums for the storage or shipment of solids, viscous liquids and radioactive waste. Whereas tight heads are best used for liquids – since the contents will need to be easily drained through the fittings.

Whether you’re shipping or storing, the proper drum makes all the difference and we at Skolnik take pride in ensuring your product, facilities and employees remain safe.

Stainless Steel in History — ‘Good for Table Cutlery’

October 12th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

Stainless Steel as we know it today owes one of its most valuable characteristics, a resistance to corrosion, to a combination of low carbon and high chromium. That characteristic was noted for the first time in 1821 by French metallurgist Pierre Berthier. But in 1821, metallurgists’ celebration of this finding was short-sighted.

Even a near century later, the full potential of this non-corrosive metal was still not on the horizon. “Especially Good for Table Cutlery,” reads the subtitle of the 1915 New York Times article boasting the benefits of this fabulous new discovery. The article calls this newfangled metal stainless steel and goes on to detail how easy it is to clean. “This steel is said to be especially adaptable for table cutlery,” the article reads “as the original polish is maintained after use, even when brought in contact with the most acid[ic] foods, and it requires only ordinary washing to cleanse.”

According to the article, this non-rusting steel was nearly double the price of steel ordinarily used for dining cutlery. But fear not, because the non-credited author of this New York Times announcement makes the case that the stainless steel is worth the extra cost in time saved laboring over the dishes.

At Skolnik, we too appreciate stainless steel’s resistance to oxidization and corrosion, but we wouldn’t dare limit such a fantastic material to the dinner table — not when it holds such potential for containment.