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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘55 gallon stainless steel drum’

Resources for Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma Aid

September 14th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, Industry News, Safety

Just as relief efforts began to bring aid to those affected by Hurricane Harvey, the country needed to brace itself for a second storm, Hurricane Irma. Hurricane Irma was a vicious storm that added to the already enormous amount of damage, loss of business, and disruption to thousands of lives Harvey has caused. Consequently, we here at Skolnik want to make sure our friends and clients have the resources at hand to make informed, effective decisions for their businesses as they respond to these disasters now and going forward.

First and foremost, the Department of Transportation has a page of useful links regarding emergency declarations and information on how the DOT and various other departments are handling these disasters. They also have information on all restrictions, delays and permits for all types of transportation, including ships, planes, railways, and trucking.

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration has also released a response to Harvey, including information on special and emergency permits, as well as important phone numbers regarding emergency hazardous materials transportation:

  • Hazardous Materials Information Center: 800-467-4922
  • Approvals and Permits Division: 202-366-4535
  • Office of Pipeline Safety: 202-366-4595

Along with these industry-specific updates, organizations such as FEMA and the EPA have more general, up-to-date information for those affected by these two storms.

For those who are not directly in the path of Harvey and Irma, there certainly are ways to help. One of the most effective means of support is supporting the non-for profits with boots already on the ground. NPR has a great list of both national and local organizations helping in those affected by Harvey, with information regarding Irma undoubtedly soon to follow. Any one of these organizations would appreciate any and all donations so they can continue their work, helping those who need it.

From 5 gallon stainless steel barrels of wine to 110 gallon 7A Type A drums for radioactive materials, Skolnik provides packaging for a wide variety of business. No matter the industry, regardless of proximity to the storm, we hope you all stayed safe last weekend and remain safe as we go into this weekend. To those of you affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, we hope for a speedy recovery for you, your businesses, and all of your loved ones.

The Many Styles of a 55 Gallon Barrel

April 17th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Industry News

A mid-sized, sturdy container, the 55 gallon barrel or drum is far and away the most common size industrial container. This industrial workhorse can be found in facilities spanning industries and its uses are numerable. It is a favorite for storage and shipment of goods both commercial and hazardous in nature. It is durable, versatile, reusable and, at Skolnik, our customers love it so much that we’ve made it available in several varieties.

Options include:

55 Gallon Carbon Steel Drum — A durable heavy-duty package for storage and transportation of a variety of contents, including hazardous materials. ailable in open and tight head configurations.

55 Gallon 7A Type A Drum — Intended for use as shipping and storage containers for permissible radioactive materials. Available in carbon or stainless steel.

55 Gallon Lever Lock Closure Drum — An easy to seal and re-open drum that eliminates the need for closing tools. Available in open head carbon configurations and salvage styles.

55 Gallon Salvage Drum — Constructed of high quality carbon steel to meet the UN design type requirements for salvage containers. Tested for international standards and ready to go.

55 Gallon TIH (PIH) Overpack Drum — Tested for solids and certified according to UN criteria, these drums qualify as secure outer packaging for overpack situations.

55 Gallon Seamless/Crevice Free Drum — Perfect for situations requiring purity and compatibility of the materials, seamless drums are just that: seamless. Often used to contain acids, metal and pharmaceutical products or in food processing.

55 Gallon Stainless Steel Drum — A classic container, stainless steel drums can outperform carbon steel in terms of corrosion resistance, tensile strength and reusability.

55 Gallon Seamless/Process Drum — These straight-sided, seamless drums are uniquely suited for the pharmaceutical, food processing and personal care industries. They are available in stainless type 304 and 316.

55 Gallon Nitric Drum — These drums demonstrate exceptional resistance to oxidization and nitric acid and are most commonly used as process drums. Their materials and seamless construction enables them to meet high sanitary standards.

55 Gallon Stainless Steel Wine Barrels — For fermentation, aging or storing wines. Stainless steel wine barrels are corrosion resistant, reusable, easy to sanitize and preserve the taste of wines without altering their flavor.

These are some of the drums we currently manufacture in a 55 gallon size. If, for whatever reason, you don’t see a drum that fits the materials or configuration you need, please don’t hesitate to reach out — Skolnik’s engineers are happy to create custom containers that fit your exacting standards. The 55 gallon size barrels and drums are so versatile and useful, the Skolnik team couldn’t resist manufacturing it in a multitude of styles.

The Many Inventors of Modern Stainless Steel

May 2nd, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

Before businesses worldwide were entrusting a Skolnik 55 gallon stainless steel drum with the shipment and storage of their most precious materials, someone had to invent stainless steel. While most people credit Harry Brearley with the discovery of stainless steel, but he was just one cog in the wheel of the invention (and definition!) of modern stainless steel.

Our journey begins in 1820 when two Englishmen, Stoddard and Farraday, and a Frenchman, Berthier, noted that iron-chromium alloys were more resistant to acids. They tried to produce higher chromium alloys to further test their discovery, but were unsuccessful.

Enter another pair of Englishmen, Woods and Clark, who in 1872 filed for the patent of an acid and weather resistant iron alloy containing 30-35% chromium and 2% tungsten. This was the first ever patent on what would, by today’s standards, be considered stainless steel. Though stainless steel was not officially defined until 1911.

The next big development, in 1875, came courtesy of another Frenchman, Brustlein. Brustlein is credited with discovering and outlining the importance of low carbon content in stainless steel – in order to create an alloy with high chromium content the carbon content must be kept lower than 0.15%. However, it wasn’t until 1895, when German scientist, Hans Goldschmidt, developed the aluminothermic reduction process for producing carbon-free chromium that the stainless steel development race truly began.

There was French scientist Leon Guillet who extensively researched iron-chromium alloys, including many of today’s models. And English Giesen who studied and published works on chromium-nickel steels while French national, Portevin, studied what is now known as 430 stainless steel.

And then, in 1911, the moment we’ve all been waiting for: German scientists P. Monnartz and W. Borschers discovered the correlation between chromium content and stainless steel’s beloved corrosion resistance. And stainless steel was finally defined.

The man often credited with the discovery of stainless steel, Harry Brearely, was a lead researcher at Brown Firth Laboratories in England. In 1912, Brearley was tasked by a small arms manufacturer with an erosion problem. Brearley set out to develop an erosion resistant steel for him, experimenting with steel alloys containing with chromium. During these experiments, specifically on August 13 1913, Brearley created a steel with 12.8% chromium and 0.24% carbon, arguably the first ever stainless steel.

Brearley’s title as “inventor of stainless steel” is greatly contested by a few americans, Elwood Haynes, Becket and Dantsizen, a polish man, Max Mauermann, and a few Swedes. Whoever is the true inventor, we and our clients want to thank them. If it weren’t for these hardworking metallurgists, researchers and scientists, Skolnik wouldn’t be able to provide our partners and customers with our expansive collection of stainless steel containers, including our crowned jewel, and most popular container, the 55 gallon stainless steel drum.

 

The Anatomy of a 55 Gallon Steel Drum

February 19th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

The most ubiquitous of the steel drum family is the 55 gallon steel drum. Whether you’re watching a movie, playing a video game or just walking in the vicinity of a plant, factory or construction site, you will probably run into a 55 gallon steel drum. In fact, at Skolnik, the 55 gallon is among our most popular and top ordered products.

However, every 55 gallon steel drum you see is not created equal. Some drums are used for waste collection, some for chemical transport, some for food storage, and each drum is constructed with a specific purpose in mind. It is very important that you discern and order the right drum for the job.

The primary factors that come into play when deciding which drum your organization needs are also the primary features of any given drum: construction material, steel thickness, head type and bung threading.

Construction material

Most drums are made of either carbon steel or stainless steel. The primary utility difference between the two is stainless steel’s elevated chemical resistance. While carbon steel drums are often used to store and transport hazardous liquids, plants that utilize aggressive chemicals often favor the versatility of a stainless steel drum. Regardless of construction material, many plants choose to line their drums for added corrosion resistance.

Steel thickness

Unsurprisingly, thicker drums are recommended for shipping more hazardous liquids. The thicker the drum the more pressure and weight it can handle. The standard denotation of thickness is X/Y/Z mm – this is representative of the thickness of lid/body/base.

Open or closed head

Drums either have an open head, where the lid can be removed, or a closed or tight head, where the lid is permanently secured. Open-head drums are favored in situations where the contents need to be accessible for addition or extraction, often times solids and thicker liquids, whereas tight-head drums are the preferred choice for lower viscosity liquids.

Bung threading

If you intend to add or extract liquids from your drum via funnel or pump, you will need to know what type of bung, or top opening, is available on the lid. Bung threads are almost always National Pipe Taper, but it’s always smart to double check as you might have a Buttress threaded bung. Both types of thread are designed to create a liquid-tight seal.

 

We hope that this exploration of the anatomy of a steel drum better helps you make the right product decision for your drum’s purpose. However, never hesitate to consult with the Skolnik team on any questions or concerns you may have. We’re always happy to share our expertise on our popular 55 gallon drums or any specialty or customized drum your operation may require.