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Industrial Packaging for Critical Contents

Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘department of transportation’

More than a Manufacturer

November 30th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Industry News

Superior drums start with superior people. Skolnik is more than a steel drum manufacturer, we’re an expert resource and industry guide. The Skolnik team is always available to answer questions and guide our partners to the best container and solution for their needs.

We’re industrial packaging manufacturers who hold our products and service to a higher standard. Our steel drums are built thicker, heavier and stronger than the industry standards, and our service extends far beyond the manufacturing process, because the industrial packaging industry extends far beyond the manufacturing process.

Our team of experts is constantly plugged-in to the transportation, storage and regulative landscape. We’re a resource for transportation information and insights and strategic storage solutions. We know the past and present of our industry and keep an eye on the future. We encourage questions and curiosity, and we’re always happy to help.

At Skolnik, we are committed to delivering steel drums that are not only strong, reliable and compliant, but that are the perfect container for our partners unique needs, materials, goals and challenges. So yes, we’re a storied steel drum manufacturer. But more than that, we’re a partner.

A Friend of Small Spaces – The 30 Gallon Drum

November 16th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Industry News

The 55 gallon drum might be the workhorse of containers, but the 30 gallon is gaining popularity, particularly in cities and growing businesses where space is at a premium. Why? Because a 30 gallon steel drum is more stackable.

Could you stack 55 gallon drums? Skolnik stainless steel drums are built heavier, thicker and stronger than the industry standards demand, so yeah, probably. But how are you going to access them? Do you really want to lift a 55 gallon drum up off of another 55 gallon drum? I thought not.

Smaller drums are easier to stack and easier to move. In general, businesses are expect to do a lot with a little. Whether that’s budget or space or both. In addition to being more small-space-friendly, our 30 gallon steel drums meet the same stringent guidelines regulated by the UN and Department of Transportation.

Whether you need to store them or ship them, a 30 gallon container is the definition of small but mighty, and with an added dose of convenient. Plus, two 30 gallon drums gives you 5 more gallons of storage than the beloved 55 gallon container anyway.

PHMSA Issues Final Rule on Shipping Hazardous Materials

October 19th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat, Safety

Earlier this week, The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) , in consultation with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), issued a final rule on shipping hazardous materials. This much anticipated rule aligns the U.S. Hazardous Materials regulations with other current international standards for the air transportation of hazardous materials.

By aligning with international standards, businesses, shippers and civilians alike can be more confident that hazardous materials are being safely and securely transported and the risk of incident is reduced.

Now finalized, the new amendments revise a number of requirements including packaging requirements and information to the pilot-in-command requirements. Several more amendments are in response to petitions for rulemaking submitted by the regulated community.

Other amendments include changes to proper shipping names, hazard classes, packing groups, special provisions, packaging authorizations, air transport quantity limitations and vessel stowage requirements.

At Skolnik, we take compliance very seriously. Our hazardous material containers are always manufactured stronger and heavier than industry and regulatory standards require.

This Final Rule is detailed in the Federal Register.

The Importance of Clarity: Overpack Drums vs. Salvage Drums

August 1st, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, Salvage Drum

We can’t overstate how important it is for everyone involved in the shipment or storage of materials to understand the requirements of the situation and materials. In our line of work, part of that is knowing the right drums are used when shipping materials in order to comply with safety standards. These safety standards are important for keeping people safe, but also for avoiding the penalties that come with using defective drums, or the wrong class of drum entirely.

In the past, there has been confusion among manufacturers, customers, and shippers about the difference between Overpack Drums and Salvage Drums. Due to a lack of clarity, and a industry wide game of telephone, Overpack Drums and Salvage Drums were thought of as the same exact products for a while. This, of course, leads to a whole array of problems. First of all, if you were to use an Overpack Drum to do the job of a Salvage Drum, your materials would not be secure. Second, that particular load would certainly not meet DOT or UN standards.

As you would guess, there is a marked difference between Salvage and Overpack. A difference that, while we are sure most everyone in this industry knows, bears repeating — which is why we revisit this topic regularly. Overpack drums are used to hold packages or materials that are still properly sealed and meet safety and shipping regulations on their own, and the drum is used to consolidate materials. Think of them as a second layer of protection, or a handy way to transport multi-pack items. Salvage drums are used to hold leaking, damaged or otherwise compromised and non-compliant packages.

Clarifying every detail of your materials or shipment is important to everyone involved. There are a laundry list of important regulations that protect us, and the environment, but without clarity and strong communication about standards and norms, it is incredibly difficult to follow them and maintain good, safe and compliant business practices.