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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘dot’

2018 New Hazmat Rules At-A-Glance

February 22nd, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Industry News

They say the only thing constant is change and that couldn’t ring more true for those of us in the dangerous goods business. As the transportation, manufacturing, chemical and hazmat industries all keep evolving, so too do the regulations that govern them. At Skolnik, we do our due diligence to ensure all of our products meet, if not exceed, the hefty regulatory standards they face. Part of that due diligence is staying on top of changes to the rules and regulations.

In 2018, a few new rules regarding hazmat containers and shipment will hit the books — here’s a quick look at what those regulations, some of which have already taken effect.

Already in effect:

International Air Transport Associations Dangerous Goods Regulations (IATA DGR), 59th Edition – In effect as of 01/01/2018

Changes include:

  • Stricter requirements regarding air-shipment of lithium batteries

  • A re-organized list of Class 9 materials (see Subsection 3.9.1)

  • A new list forecasting changes for air shippers in 2019 (Appenix I).

Furthermore, IATA has already published an addendum to this year’s DGR that impacts air shippers and airline passengers alike, so look for that as well.

2016 International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code) — Updates in effect as of 01/01/2018

Reinforces updates that were made in the 2016 edition. Compliance to these updates was voluntary last year, as of this year they are officially mandatory.

Rules include:

  • New dangerous goods marking and labeling criteria

  • New packing instructions for certain shipments of engines, lithium batteries and aerosols

  • Adjustments to the IMDG Code Dangerous Goods list

Coming soon:

Enhanced Safety Provisions for Lithium Batteries by Air (RIN 2137-AF20)  — Expected 02/2018

This Interim Final Rule will harmonize the 49 CFR hazmat regulations with evolving international standards for the air shipment of lithium batteries. International requirements already in effect under the latest IATA DGR will be adopted into 49 CFR.

Rules include:

  • Prohibiting lithium-ion cells and batteries as cargo on passenger aircraft

  • Limiting state-of-charge to 30%

  • Limiting the use of alternate provisions for small cells or batteries by air

Response to Industry Petitions (RIN 2137-AF09) — Expected 02/2018

Currently, parties must petition US DOT to amend, remove or add hazmat regulations to enhance safety/efficiency for shippers and carriers. In 2018, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) plans to address 19 of these petitions. This response will likely include new amendments and rules.

 

Miscellaneous Amendments Pertaining to DOT Specification Cylinders (RIN 2137-AE80) — Expected 04/2018

Likewise, DOT will address various petitions from industry stakeholders. These petitions pertain to the manufacture, maintenance and use of DOT specification cylinders. This ruling will incorporate two existing hazmat special permits into the 49 CFR Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR)

 

EPA’s Electronic Hazardous Waste Manifest System — Roll-out to begin 06/2018

The Hazardous Waste Manifest is a shipping paper required for the transport of hazardous waste, and hazardous waste is regulated in transport by US DOT. While this rulemaking has implications across various industries, here are the consequences specific to hazmat shippers:

The new e-Manifest system will be rolled out on/by June 30th. The EPA plans to utilize the e-Manifest to collect domestic hazardous waste manifests and domestic shipments of State-only regulated hazardous wastes. The e-Manifest system will be funded via user fees for the treatment, storage, and disposal facilities and State-only waste receiving facilities.

Oil Spill Response Plans for High-Hazard Flammable Trains (RIN 2137-AF08) — Expected 07/2018

A Final Rule from DOT to expand the applicability of oil spill response plans for trains transporting Class 3 flammable liquids in specific volumes and orientations across the train. This requirement will apply to High-Hazard Flammable Trains (HHFTs).

These are just the new hazmat rules that are already on the horizon. As always, Skolnik will continue to monitor future regulations or updates that may impact operations, shippers, brokers and carriers, and we encourage all other dangerous goods professionals to do the same.

Doing your due diligence now can prevent a disaster (or hefty fine) later.

What Exactly IS The Transportation Index?

August 17th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Industry News

There are a number of decisions and calculations involved in the safe transportation of potentially dangerous radioactive materials. Along with considerations such as selecting the right containers (our 7A Type A Drums are great choice for many of these shipping solutions), a crucial rating is the Transportation Index (TI).

Despite its importance, it’s easy to lose the definition of the Transportation Index (TI) among the deluge of terminology, ratings, and regulations. It’s a daunting task to keep track of it all. If you see “TI”, and know that it means “___ sticker goes on the drum,” but would like to fully understand what the term refers to, here is a quick explainer:

The TI is a measurement of radiation that is considered when shipping radioactive material. It does not, however, reflect any relationship with a human body or any maximum safe dose regulations. Rather, it is the measurement of the maximum dose of radiation you would receive one meter away from a package containing radioactive material.

This measurement is then utilized in conjunction with the metrics that establish which colored label a container requires. If a container has a white “Radioactive I” label, no Transportation Index is necessary because these packages produce a negligible reading at one meter. For a package with a yellow “Radioactive II” label, the TI must not exceed 0.01 mSv h-1, and packages with a yellow “Radioactive III” label have a TI that exceeds 0.01 mSv h-1.

There are additional rules for packages that are shipped together. In general, if multiple radioactive packages are being transported together in a common carrier vehicle, the sums of the TIs for all packages must not exceed 0.5 mSv h-1. However, if the vehicle is being used exclusively for the transport of radioactive material, the TI allowances are increased.

These are only a few of the rules and regulations that use the transportation index as a factor. Always consult with the Department of Transportation to make sure you’re fully compliant. However, we hope this helps provide some clarity as you navigate the rules surrounding shipping radioactive materials. Armed with the right information, and perhaps a Skolnik 7A drum, should make the task less intimidating.

Open Head vs. Tight Head Steel Drums At A Glance

July 20th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Industry News

There are numerous different configurations of an industrial container. When determining which container is appropriate for a specific use, businesses consider the container’s material, gauge or thickness of the material, size, shape, linings, closures, head style, and many more factors. Some of these factors come with a multitude of options, for head style, it is just a choice between two: open head or tight head.

So what is the difference between an open and tight head drum?

An open head container, also called 1A2 drums, has a fully removable cover secured with a Lever lock or bolt ring closure. Tight head drums, also known as closed head or 1A1 drums, have a non-removable top. One can only access the container via a 2” and ¾” plug in the top of the container.

On a tight head drum, the head is an integral part of the drum construction — both ends are flanged and permanently sealed. Because of the limited access to the contents, tight head drums are often used for liquids, especially lower viscosity liquids. For example, Skolnik’s stainless steel wine drums are tight head containers.

Open head drums, on the other hand, are used for a wide array of contents. Skolnik’s lever lock closure drums are UN rated for solids and liquids, particularly thicker liquids such as soil absorbents, syrups, glues, oils, etc. Open head drums are typically used in situations where people need access to the contents, either for frequent addition or extraction.

Skolnik Industries manufactures both open head and tight head steel drums in over 500 configurations, always to UN and DOT certification standards. If you are unsure what style head or closure your contents require, don’t hesitate to ask a Skolnik representative.

Safe Lithium Battery Containment

June 23rd, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, Industry News

Lithium-ion batteries are the most commonly used batteries in consumer electronics and medical devices today, and they have been exploding. For all of the benefits and conveniences, lithium batteries have offered consumers — higher power density, lower memory effect, long life — they have a number of downsides and risks. Their sensitivity can lead to an explosion and, for this reason, they are considered “dangerous goods” and are banned from commercial aircraft.

The result is a kink in the supply line and, for those who rely on medical devices powered by lithium batteries, more than a mild inconvenience. At present, these batteries are only permitted on cargo aircraft and cargo planes only fly to large airports. As a result, the batteries cannot get to their final destinations.

The world isn’t going to suddenly stop needing lithium ion batteries anytime soon, so this is a puzzle that needs a solution. But, you know what they say: Necessity is the mother of invention. Skolnik Industries and Labelmaster have been working together to devise a package that can safely contain spent lithium ion batteries for bulk transport. This overpack package would serve as a multi-pack solution for the batteries as well as a secondary spill containment measure should the batteries be compromised in transit.

While it is always a pleasure to work with our friends at Labelmaster, we’re eager to find a safe and strong solution to this problem. The project cannot be completed until the DOT releases its final testing requirements for these package types, and, as with all Skolnik Industries products, this lithium battery-safe overpack container would be rigorously tested to meet all pertinent DOT regulations.

Once the regulations are set, we look forward to providing shippers and manufacturers with a safe, efficient solution to lithium battery containment, and helping alleviate the delay for those who need battery replacements for their medical devices.