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Industrial Packaging for Critical Contents

Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘hazardous materials’

Epoxy Phenolic Lined Steel Drums

July 21st, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Industry News

Steel drums are a versatile packaging for the transport and storage of many materials. However, there are some materials, usually liquids in the food or chemical industries, that may not be compatible with steel. In these cases, drum linings are used to protect both the contents and the drum from contact due to damage or contamination from their interaction. The drum lining most commonly used at Skolnik is an epoxy/phenolic lining.

Epoxy phenolic coatings offer consistent high quality protection for a wide range of applications. The lining is created by combining heat-cured epoxy resin with thermosetting phenolic resin. The chemical resistance from these two resins makes for an ideal lining for a container holding liquids such as food products, detergents, latex paints or other materials with a pH range above 7.

This lining has high resistance to 92%-98% sulfuric acid at temperatures up to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. The coating is also resistant to hydrochloric acid, phenol, anhydrous chlorobenzene, carbon tetrachloride and many other chemicals. An epoxy phenolic lining is also flexible. So, when applied correctly, the lining can adhere to a dent and bend with the metal, preventing any chipping or contamination of the contents.

At Skolnik, we strive to protect our clients, their materials and communities by connecting them with the right container for their contents and needs. Our lined steel drums are just one way we ensure that our drums are thicker, heavier and stronger enough to do the job. Free compatibility testing is available, and recommended, to insure content integrity.

Liquids-Certified Overpack Drum

June 13th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Salvage Drum

Using a drum that has been tested and certified to hold your particular contents is crucial. If you came to this post looking for details on an overpack container for your liquids, we are sorry to disappoint. Despite the post title, there is no such thing as a liquids-certified overpack drum. Why? Well, that answer is pretty clear once you think about it.

An overpack is a container that makes handling a package more convenient or consolidates two packages that are not leaking. It is designed to hold another container. That other container is considered a solid, regardless of what it is holding inside. Overpack drums are often used in multi-pack situations too. In all cases, the overpack technically contains a solid.

But what if you want to use an overpack drum to contain a liquids-certified package that is leaking? You shouldn’t. Overpack drums are not certified for liquids or to hold damaged packages. The container inside an overpack must be intact, if it is damaged, defective or leaking you must use a salvage drum.

Some sources use the terms overpack and salvage interchangeably, but they are not the same. We have previous blogs that cover the differences between salvage drums and overpack drums in more detail. One of the differences? There is such thing as a liquids-certified salvage drum.

Secondary Spill Containment: The Power of Prevention

May 1st, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat, Safety

Containing and transporting hazardous materials or potentially dangerous goods is not a task to be taken lightly. The DOT, UN and EPA all have their own specific regulations regarding the avoidance and management of hazmat leaks and spills and at Skolnik, we strive to prepare businesses and shippers with the tools they need to maintain compliance and keep everyone safe. A solid plan and preparation is the best defense against a potential spill. The EPA calls such planning SPCC, and while it is specifically written with oil spills in mind, we think it holds several important lessons and tips for the handling of any dangerous good.

What does SPCC mean?

SPCC stands for Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures and it is a key component of the EPA’s oil spill prevention program. Essentially, an SPCC plan is a prevention plan for oil spills and leaks related to non-transportation related on or offshore oil operations.

Prevention is Key

While the EPA also requires oil operations to have a facilities response plan in place – the first step to solving a disaster such as an oil spill is to avoid it all together.

When handling dangerous goods of any kind, it is always better to be safe than sorry. Hazardous materials pose a grave threat to your employees, facility, community and/or the environment as a whole. No matter how careful you are in your operations, there is always a risk of a spill or leak. That’s where an SPCC plan comes in — as a Plan B in case all of your other careful planning has failed you.

In the business of transporting and storing hazardous materials, the most common and trusted form of SPCC are drum spill containers, or secondary spill containers.

Drum Spill Containers / Secondary Spill Containers

Drum spill containers are containers used in the event of an industrial hazardous or chemical spill. All Skolnik steel spill containers are suitable for clean up use or as secondary containment. Secondary spill containers are used either in response to an already leaking package,  in which case the leaking package will be contained in the secondary spill drum, thus mitigating the dangers of the leak; or as a preventative measure, in which case a non-leaking container holding hazardous materials is sealed within a secondary spill container for transportation and storage as an extra safety measure.

Secondary containment requirements are addressed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) contained in title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 264, the 2006 Uniform Fire Code (UFC) in standard 60.3.2.8.3 and in the 2012 International Fire Code (IFC) in 5004.2.

Keeping up with Compliance: UN Certified Packaging

March 24th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN

You are probably already a safe, savvy and compliant business, but sometimes even businesses who follow UN and DOT regulations don’t fully understand them. The shipping and storage industry is heavily regulated — especially when it comes to handling hazardous materials or consumer goods such as pharmaceuticals or food and beverage. All of these rules and regulations have been put in place to protect transportation workers, the environment and the population. But, when you purchase UN certified packaging, what exactly does that mean?

The Manufacturer

Let us break it down for you. When buying a UN certified drum, the entire design of the drum, and all of its components is defined by the test samples. Each element — heads, ring, gasket, bolt, nut, plugs — must meet UN specified requirements. If even one of these components, or the design of the drum itself, doesn’t measure up, the drum is not UN compliant. At Skolnik, we

The initial onus for meeting UN standards is on the manufacturer, but once a UN certified package leaves our hands, it is up the filler to maintain compliance.

The Filler

Users cannot alter or exchange any of these components without it impacting the ability for the drum to perform as tested and certified.

If you were to purchase a UN certified drum with a nut and bolt style closure, but later swap that closure for a Leverlock, this would void the UN certification. At this stage in the container’s lifecycle, it is the fillers responsibility to adhere to UN regulations. If replacement parts are needed, fillers must make sure that they get original components form the original manufacturer that continue to meet the test criteria of that specific drum.

Make sure you always follow Skolnik’s Closure Instructions to verify a proper closure before passing the buck to your shipper.

The Shipper

Once a drum is filled, compliance with the UN certification is the responsibility of the shipper. It is up to the shipper to read the UN code and ensure the container is safely stored or shipped according to its contents.

Remember, no matter where you are in the journey of a container, non-compliance comes with a hefty fine. Fines for non-compliant shipments, of dangerous goods especially, are getting larger and more frequent. For the sake of your employees, facility and community, please keep an eye on evolving regulations and restrictions to ensure your UN certified packaging maintains compliance at every stage.