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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘hazardous materials’

Regulations and Secondary Spill Containment

February 4th, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat

The transportation and storage of hazardous materials is a tricky business. There are loads of regulations from the UN, the Department of Transportation and others, and failure to meet those regulations can result in a hefty fine and property, environmental or physical damage due to a leak. Skolnik Industries takes great care to ensure that all of our drums are perfectly suited for their intended contents and meet all necessary regulations. An important and popular safety measure used for the transportation and storage of hazardous materials is a secondary containment system.

Of course, secondary containers have their own set of regulations. Here are a few of the main points of regulations surrounding secondary containment:

 

  1. Strength and durability

Your secondary containment system must be impervious and free of cracks or gaps. It’s recommended that you inspect your containment system regularly (especially if you are storing materials for an extended period of time). Any damage to the sump or the containment unit itself can lead to system failure and a leak.

Obviously, your containment system should be chemically compatible with whatever liquids might come in contact with it. Skolnik can help guide you to proper materials and containment for your contents.

  1.  Sloped or draining

Your secondary containment system must include a slope or be specifically designed to efficiently remove any liquid spilling or leaking from the primary unit inside. Primary containers cannot sit in their own waste. A popular solution to this regulation is to raise the secondary containers on grates, decking or wood pallets or adding a drain to your secondary containment unit. That way, any leaking fluid can be directed away to the sump to be collected.

  1. Capacity

According to regulations, secondary containment systems “must have sufficient capacity to contain at least 10% of the total volume of the primary containers or 100% of the volume of the largest container, whichever is greater”

That’s a lot of capacity, but also a lot of math! These are just the federal containment regulations, so make sure you work with Skolnik to ensure your containment capacity meets any state-level regulations as well.

  1. Mother Nature-resistant

Your secondary containment system must be impervious to the weather — specifically, precipitation. If any rainwater or other precipitation can get into the secondary containment system, your capacity must be sufficient enough to contain the additional volume. Remember all of that math? If you don’t want to have to add predicting the weather to your to-do list, it might be easier to just keep the weather out.

That said, any rainwater or snowmelt that enters the sump of your secondary containment is also taking up capacity in your system. Take care to implement a system that won’t overflow.

  1. Waste Removal

Any waste or precipitation that has spilled or leaked into the secondary containment area must be removed in a timely manner to prevent overflow. It’s no surprise that a huge part of a secondary containment system is maintaining the cleanliness, integrity and capacity of that system.

 

In the end, your secondary spill containment is a safety measure. In an ideal world, your primary container will remain unscathed and strong. But, in the event of a spill or leak, you want (and need) to have your bases covered. We at Skolnik are here to help make sure you always have the most effective and compliant containers for your specific materials, whether they are hazardous materials or not.

Choosing the Right Drum: Hazardous Materials

October 29th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat

Most materials shipped or stored throughout the world are contained in a steel drum. This includes hazardous materials or dangerous goods. And at Skolnik, we take proper hazmat containment seriously.

Choosing the right drum for the job is always important, but when it comes to hazardous materials, that importance may be tenfold.

There are many questions to consider when determining the proper container for hazardous material:

  • What type of steel should I use?
  • What size drum do I need?
  • Should the drum be lined?
  • If so, what type of liner should I use? Epoxy-phenolic, 100% clear phenolic or pigmented phenolic?
  • How will the materials be transported?
  • What requirements must be met to safely and legally transport my container on train, truck, sea or air?
  • What certifications does my container require? UN certification? OSHA? EPA? DOT? All of the above?

With so many things to consider when shipping or storing hazardous goods, it can be daunting to get the job done. But at Skolnik, we can help. When you’re shipping hazardous materials, it is your responsibility as the shipper that your contents are properly classified, packaged and labeled, so take care and ask questions to ensure that we can provide you with the right container for your needs. Asking questions up front can save time, money and lives when it comes to the transport or storage of your materials.

Reduce risk and avoid incident with proper hazmat containment. Talk to a Skolnik Industries representative to ensure your contents, facilities, transport vehicles, employees and anyone who may come in contact with your materials are kept safe and protected throughout your containers storage or transport.

When to Use an Overpack Drum?

July 13th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Safety, Salvage Drum

An Overpack is an enclosure used to provide protection or convenience in handling a package, or to consolidate two or more packages. Overpacks are not the same as Salvage Drums and are only meant for non-leaking packages. If an Overpack drum is sold as a Salvage Drum, the DOT will hold the manufacturer and distributor liable and both parties could face a fine. The DOT does, however, expect a level of knowledge from the shipper and can hold them liable if they do not meet the proper requirements or misuse a drum.

So when should you use an Overpack Drum?

According to UN criteria and standards, Overpack Drums are certified as secure outer packaging. They are tested for solids and should not be used if the integrity of the inner package has been compromised.

An Overpack can be simply defined as a larger container into which a smaller one may be placed. An Overpack can be made of any material, the traditional choice being a 55 gallon metal drum. Overpack Drums come with their own set of UN and DOT requirements, but passing leak and pressure tests are not always among them. More often than not, Overpacks are used to facilitate the handling of another package or two. Skolnik, however, does pressure test Overpack Drums. Our Stainless steel Overpack Drums have each been tested at 1A2/X plus 15 psi hydrostatic pressure per CFR 49 for the over-packing of Toxic (Poisonous) by Inhalation packaging. But despite this rigorous testing and the fact that Skolnik products are made thicker, heavier and stronger than industry standards require, the DOT would still not consider our Overpack Drums as Salvage Drums.

But fear not, if it is a Salvage Drum you need, Skolnik can still help. Both our Overpack and Salvage Drum lines come in a variety of capacities, meet domestic and international regulations and offer extreme durability.

Ship It: Hazmat Containment and the DOT

June 11th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat

For as long as human civilization has existed on planet earth, people have been sending and shipping things. From hand delivered love letters and The Pony Express to UPS and FedEx, we are constantly sending communication and products around town and around the globe. Everything must travel – even hazardous materials.

The Secretary of the Department of Transportation defines hazardous materials as any substances that pose an unreasonable threat. For each product or material that is obviously hazardous; oil, combustible materials, Looney Toon style bombs, The Hulk, etc, there is one that the general public may not even realize calls for hazmat treatment. The DOT breaks these ‘unreasonably threatening’ materials down into nine classes: explosives, gases, flammable liquids, flammable solids, organic peroxides, toxic substances, radioactive materials, corrosives and miscellaneous dangerous goods.

These materials may be hazardous, but they still have to travel. In order to safely ship hazardous materials around the nation and world, companies must meet a series of shipping requirements. These requirements begin with their containment and the handling of hazmat containers.

In order to be air-worthy, a hazmat container must be “designed and constructed to prevent leakage that may be caused by changes in altitude and temperature during transportation aboard aircraft.” Additionally, airborne regulations include proper closures, use of absorbent materials and maximum quantities for passenger-carrying aircrafts. It is the shipper’s responsibility that their containers are compliant with their location of origin and the intended destination, labeled according to their hazmat class and handled by trained employees. Should anything happen, proper and thorough incident reporting is the first line of defense.

The transportation of hazardous materials requires an immense knowledge of not only the products being shipped but also the regulations, requirements and capabilities of all packaging and containment options. Every class of hazmat material and form of transportation has a different set of requirements. If you find yourself unsure about the containment and shipping of any hazardous materials, feel free to consult the team at Skolnik Industries or other sources such as the 49 CFR.

Skolnik’s staff and containment offering will certainly meet, if not exceed, both your expectations and the standards and UN requirements of hazmat transportation.