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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘open head containers’

Unpacking UN Ratings: The 1A2 Drum

September 22nd, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat

The shipping and transportation of dangerous goods or hazardous materials is a tightly regulated process — and rightly so! You wouldn’t want to be on an aircraft or train or sharing the roads with just any old material packaged any old way. These materials require a special container that meets criteria set by the DOT and the UN. And, it is the responsibility of the shipper to choose the correct packaging for their materials.

At Skolnik Industries, we’re always happy to help our customers select the best container for their needs. To start, let’s take a look at UN ratings and what they mean.

Many of our products UN rating begins with a 1A, we’ll talk about why that is in a moment, but for the sake of this exploration let’s say that you worked with the team at Skolnik and we discerned that you need a container with a 1A2/X60/S UN rating for your hazardous materials.

First, you’re in luck, Skolnik has several hazardous waste containers that fit that specification.

But what do those numbers mean?

 

Well, the 1 refers to the fact that it is a drum, not a wooden barrel, box, bag or some other type of container.

Here are the UN codes for other containers:

1 – drum

2 – wooden barrel

3 – jerrican

4 – box

5 – bag

6 – composite receptacle

7 – pressure receptacle

 

The following letter tells us the material of the container, in this case an A for steel.

Other material codes:

A – steel

B – aluminum

C – natural wood

D – plywood

E – reconstituted wood

G – fiberboard

H – plastic

L – textile

M – paper, multiwall

N – metal other than steel or aluminum

P – glass, porcelain or stoneware

 

So far we’ve determined that we need a steel drum, our specialty! But what about the second number? This number refers to the drum head. The 2 means that it is an open head drum. (A closed-head drum would be marked with a 1).

We’ve cracked the first part of the code: we need a 1A2 container, or a steel, open head drum!

If you want to dig deeper, our example UN rating was 1A2/X60/S – so what are the other parts?

 

The X designation tells us what level of hazardous materials your packaging can be used for. The rating is either an X, Y or Z. Packing group I is the most hazardous and packing group III is the least.

X – covers hazardous packing group I, II or III

Y – covers packing groups II and III only

Z – covers packing group III only

What a versatile drum we’ve chosen!

 

That next number refers to the maximum gross mass the container has been tested to handle, in our example 60kg. The final S indicates that this is the UN rating for solids for this container (Liquids ratings differ in that they communicate the maximum specific gravity of liquid that the container has been tested to hold instead of mass, liquid ratings also indicate the maximum hydrostatic pressure the container can hold).
So there you have it, when we say you need a 1A2 drum, that means it is a steel, open head drum – the remaining code elements tell you what your container is safe to carry.

The Powerful Properties of Stainless Steel

January 21st, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

 

At Skolnik Industries, we offer a variety of stainless steel drums; in different sizes, with different closures and linings and tailored for our customers’ unique needs. Why do we offer so many different customizations of stainless steel drums? Because it’s a material greatly suited for many different uses.

By definition, stainless steel is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass. Now, we’ve talked about the unique chromium composition of stainless steel in the past, but what properties make stainless steel the powerful material it is today?

Oxidization Resistance

Chromium forms a passive protective layer when exposed to oxygen. This layer is invisible to the naked eye, but protects the metal from damage from water and air and even a degree of corrosion. The higher the chromium content, the stronger the oxidation resistance.

Acid Resistance

Stainless steel is highly resistant to acids. Obviously, this depends on the concentration of the acid and a few other variables such as the environmental temperature and the grade of stainless steel, but the natural resistance of stainless steel to acid attacks make it a strong candidate for the transport of hazardous materials.

Base Resistance

Many grades of stainless steel (the entire 300 series) are unaffected by weak bases, no matter the temperature or concentration.

Organic Resistance

Under the right conditions, specific grades of stainless steel are useful for storing and handling organics such as acetic acid, aldehydes and amines, cellulose acetate, and fats and fatty acids.

Low conductivity and magnetism

Like it’s brother, steel, stainless steel is a poor conductor of electricity and only very specific stainless steels are magnetic.
So there you have it, the primary properties of stainless steel are a recipe for a diverse array of possible uses. It’s no wonder it’s one of the most popular materials in a number of industries and one of the most common materials for Skolnik drums.

Choosing Your Drum: Open Head or Tight Head

October 15th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, Stainless Steel

At Skolnik Industries, we provide our customers with countless options when it comes to customizing their drums. It’s crucial to us that your Skolnik steel drum is the exact fit for your needs. Among the options you’ll encounter when selecting/customizing your drum is the type of ‘head’.

There are two types of drum heads: tight head and open head. The tight head steel drum is, well, sealed tight. It has both ends seamed and no removable lid. You can only access the contents of a tight head steel drum through fittings.

An open head steel drum, however, has a removable cover and fully seamed bottom. Once you’ve determined an open-head steel drum is right for your materials, you’ll have to make more choices. First and foremost, the type of closure you desire: bolt or lever ring. And, of course, whether you require your drum to be United Nations (UN), Department of Transportation (DOT) and/or hazardous materials/dangerous goods certified. (Tight-head drums  manufactured for certification standards as well).

Open head drums are considered the best drums for the storage or shipment of solids, viscous liquids and radioactive waste. Whereas tight heads are best used for liquids – since the contents will need to be easily drained through the fittings.

Whether you’re shipping or storing, the proper drum makes all the difference and we at Skolnik take pride in ensuring your product, facilities and employees remain safe.

Deciphering the Code: 1A2 Drums

May 4th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, Stainless Steel

The title of this post isn’t meant to be a super-secret code; it’s meant to denote a UN certified drum of a specific material. Most simply put, a 1A2 drum is a UN certified open head steel drum. The coding helps anyone coming into contact with the drum to understand key characteristics of the container and it’s intended, safe uses, and proper shipping and storage procedures.

So what goes into these codes? Well, the ‘1’ indicates that this container is a drum. Of course, if you saw the drum, you’d recognize that it is a drum, but on paper, such as shipping and storage manifestos, the container classification is pertinent to proper operations and organization. The ‘A’ informs the reader that this container is made of steel. The material of a container speaks volumes to how it should be used, filled and any safety requirements. Finally, the ‘2’ tells the reader that this steel drum has an open head, meaning the lid of the drum is detachable and can be removed.

With this knowledge, anyone can decipher the UN coding: this container is an open head steel drum. And should be used as such.

Open head? That means this drum has a removable lid secured to the drum with a bolt ring or a lever lock to prevent the container from opening in transit.

Steel? Fantastic. Steel drums are often used for the containment of chemicals, pharmaceuticals and food for storage or transport. Stainless steel is a compatible material for the containment of a wide variety of different products and items, but we still recommend discussing your needs with a Skolnik representative before choosing a specific type of drum.

Now that you can read the code, call Skolnik to learn more about our products and what type of container is the best fit for your needs.