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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘salvage drum regulation’

What Are UN Packing Groups?

November 27th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Salvage Drum

All of our products here at Skolnik have been rigorously tested to meet every relevant safety standard required for each of their uses. One such regulation standard that containers such as our overpack salvage drums have is a UN marking, providing valuable information about the contents of the drums. While they can be a bit mystifying, we have resources to help answer questions about those markings, and once explained, most of these make sense. Right in the middle of the code there is, however, a letter designation that perhaps needs more elaboration: the X, Y, or Z of the UN Packing Group.

Each letter describes which of groups I, II and III the container is appropriate for. These groups identify the hazard level of the package, with each groups then representing three levels of danger: I is the highest, II is a medium hazard, and III is the lowest rating.Thus, the letter on the salvage drum establishes what level of protection the container provides and what products can be stored in them.

While this letter may be enough information for day to day operations, this leaves one last question still unaddressed: how does the UN determine what is low, medium, and high danger?

The answer to this is found in the very dry and technical Manual of Tests and Criteria, in which UN details their elaborate testing process for various types of materials. Throughout the graphs and charts, one can find that all explosives are assigned to group II. Or if handling flammable liquids, according to the manual, anything that has a flash point greater than 23 degrees Celsius but less than 60.5 degrees is in group III. There are specifications for substances liable to spontaneous combustion, and for ones that, when in contact with water, emit flammable gases. Multiple types of hazards are examined, quantified, and categorized according to how quickly they explode, burn, or corrode.

So, as it turns out, there is elaborate, methodical and thorough science behind these threat-level groups. These categorizations then go on to inform how the materials ought to be stored. While that’s a bit of a reassuring no-brainer, details such as these can easily be overlooked and taken for granted in the hustle and bustle of shipping logistics. Whether you’re trying to decide which Skolnik brand overpack salvage drum is most appropriate for your needs, or have used the same Skolnik brand overpack salvage drum for years, having a fuller appreciation of the container and its components can provide you with the confidence that you’re making the right choices in your business.

Salvage Drums vs. Overpack Drums

January 15th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Salvage Drum

What is a Salvage Drum?

Salvage drums are designed to contain leaking, damaged or non-compliant drums containing hazardous materials. If a company or shipper discovers a hazardous package leaking or damaged or has rags used to clean up a spill or leak, they must use a salvage drum in order to safely transport the package or materials.

Salvage drums can be made of steel, polyethylene, aluminum or metal and must be larger than the leaking package so that the damaged and dangerous materials can fit safely inside of the enclosed salvage drum. In order to qualify as a salvage drum, the container needs to meet a number of criteria and pass two very severe leak-proof and integrity tests.

What is an Overpack Container?

The DOT does not consider overpack drums as salvage drums. Traditionally, an overpack is a container that makes handling a package more convenient or consolidates two packages that are not leaking.

Why does it matter?

Many manufacturers have referred to salvage drums as overpacks over the years, increasing the recognition of the term overpack versus salvage. However, while you can use a salvage drum as an overpack container, not all overpack containers are salvage drums. Remember, salvage drums have undergone rigorous testing in order to be deemed qualified for their use containing hazardous materials. A drum that is merely labeled as an overpack, has not.

The unwitting misuse of an overpack drum as a salvage container can have dire consequences so make sure you are always purchasing and/or using the correct drums when transporting hazardous materials so as not to compromise your safety and the safety of others.

salvage

At Skolnik, we offer Overpack Salvage Drums – these meet or exceed the UN and DOT requirements for Salvage drums but can also be used for overpack.