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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘shipment of hazardous materials’

Overpack Container Regulations At-A-Glance

January 5th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, HazMat, Salvage Drum

An overpack drum is a type of protective packaging manufactured to contain non-hazardous or hazardous materials or provide outer protection for another container to prevent or mitigate damage. At its most basic definition, an overpack is simply a large container in which another smaller container can be placed. Overpacks can be made out of any material — such as Skolnik’s steel overpack drums. The Department of Transportation (DOT) regulates the movement of all hazardous materials and have specific performance standards that overpack containers must meet.

Not to be confused with Salvage Drums or Salvage Overpack Drums, Overpacks are designed to protect non-leaking containers or to be used as a combination pack.

Because they are designed to provide additional protection, they are built stronger and must meet more stringent requirements than other containers.

So what are a few of those regulations?

  • Overpack containers must always have a UN marking on them that specifies the type of hazardous materials it is certified to contain.
  • An overpack will never have a liquids rating because it is designed to hold another container — a solid. Regardless of what the inner package contains, the overpack technically contains a solid.
  • The container inside an overpack must be intact — if the container is damaged, defective or leaking you must use a salvage drum.

Salvage drums, on the other hand, are certified to hold damaged, leaking or non-compliant containers and are held to even stricter regulations than overpack drums.

These are just a high level overview of the DOT’s overpack regulations. Remember that preparing hazardous materials for shipment can be complicated, and safety and compliance are key. Reserve the task of packing your hazardous materials for someone who has the appropriate DOT hazmat shipping training.

Skolnik Industries TIH (PIH) Overpack Drums range from a 20 gallon overpack to an 85 gallon overpack drum and are certified according to UN criteria and qualify as secure outer packaging. If you have any questions about using an overpack or salvage drum, don’t hesitate to ask your Skolnik representative.

Ship It: Hazmat Containment and the DOT

June 11th, 2015 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat

For as long as human civilization has existed on planet earth, people have been sending and shipping things. From hand delivered love letters and The Pony Express to UPS and FedEx, we are constantly sending communication and products around town and around the globe. Everything must travel – even hazardous materials.

The Secretary of the Department of Transportation defines hazardous materials as any substances that pose an unreasonable threat. For each product or material that is obviously hazardous; oil, combustible materials, Looney Toon style bombs, The Hulk, etc, there is one that the general public may not even realize calls for hazmat treatment. The DOT breaks these ‘unreasonably threatening’ materials down into nine classes: explosives, gases, flammable liquids, flammable solids, organic peroxides, toxic substances, radioactive materials, corrosives and miscellaneous dangerous goods.

These materials may be hazardous, but they still have to travel. In order to safely ship hazardous materials around the nation and world, companies must meet a series of shipping requirements. These requirements begin with their containment and the handling of hazmat containers.

In order to be air-worthy, a hazmat container must be “designed and constructed to prevent leakage that may be caused by changes in altitude and temperature during transportation aboard aircraft.” Additionally, airborne regulations include proper closures, use of absorbent materials and maximum quantities for passenger-carrying aircrafts. It is the shipper’s responsibility that their containers are compliant with their location of origin and the intended destination, labeled according to their hazmat class and handled by trained employees. Should anything happen, proper and thorough incident reporting is the first line of defense.

The transportation of hazardous materials requires an immense knowledge of not only the products being shipped but also the regulations, requirements and capabilities of all packaging and containment options. Every class of hazmat material and form of transportation has a different set of requirements. If you find yourself unsure about the containment and shipping of any hazardous materials, feel free to consult the team at Skolnik Industries or other sources such as the 49 CFR.

Skolnik’s staff and containment offering will certainly meet, if not exceed, both your expectations and the standards and UN requirements of hazmat transportation.