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Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘un certification’

304 vs 316 Grade Stainless Steel Drums

November 5th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Stainless Steel

By definition, stainless steel is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass. However, there isn’t just one kind of stainless steel. There are numerous grades of stainless steel all with variations in density, elasticity, thermal conductivity and other properties. When it comes to a stainless steel that must endure corrosive environments, which most stainless steel industrial containers must, austenitic stainless steels are the most popular choices. But even then, there are two popular grades: 304 and 316 stainless steel. So, what grade stainless steel drum is right for you?

304 stainless steel is generally the most common austenitic steel used due to it’s high nickel and chromium content. The high chromium content gives 304 stainless steel drums and other products excellent corrosion resistance.

316 stainless steel also has high amounts of chromium and nickel, but with a significant amount of molybdenum, grade 316 stainless steel possesses an even higher level of corrosion resistance.

What grade of stainless steel you need largely depends on your use. In the case of stainless steel drums, it largely depends on the materials you wish to contain or ship and any regulations governing those materials.

For example, while 304 is often used in commercial food processing, 316 is considered one of the most suitable choices for marine applications, medical devices and chemical processing or storage. 304 has better formability and is generally more affordable, but 316 may be a better choice when working with/containing corrosive environments or where greater strength and hardness are required.

At Skolnik, we know our steel and are happy to guide our partners to the most efficient and effective material and container for their needs.

The Importance of Clarity: Overpack Drums vs. Salvage Drums

August 1st, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN, Salvage Drum

We can’t overstate how important it is for everyone involved in the shipment or storage of materials to understand the requirements of the situation and materials. In our line of work, part of that is knowing the right drums are used when shipping materials in order to comply with safety standards. These safety standards are important for keeping people safe, but also for avoiding the penalties that come with using defective drums, or the wrong class of drum entirely.

In the past, there has been confusion among manufacturers, customers, and shippers about the difference between Overpack Drums and Salvage Drums. Due to a lack of clarity, and a industry wide game of telephone, Overpack Drums and Salvage Drums were thought of as the same exact products for a while. This, of course, leads to a whole array of problems. First of all, if you were to use an Overpack Drum to do the job of a Salvage Drum, your materials would not be secure. Second, that particular load would certainly not meet DOT or UN standards.

As you would guess, there is a marked difference between Salvage and Overpack. A difference that, while we are sure most everyone in this industry knows, bears repeating — which is why we revisit this topic regularly. Overpack drums are used to hold packages or materials that are still properly sealed and meet safety and shipping regulations on their own, and the drum is used to consolidate materials. Think of them as a second layer of protection, or a handy way to transport multi-pack items. Salvage drums are used to hold leaking, damaged or otherwise compromised and non-compliant packages.

Clarifying every detail of your materials or shipment is important to everyone involved. There are a laundry list of important regulations that protect us, and the environment, but without clarity and strong communication about standards and norms, it is incredibly difficult to follow them and maintain good, safe and compliant business practices.

 

The Basics of UN Drums

July 13th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN

Proper packaging is crucial, especially for dangerous goods. Using the wrong container to transport or store your goods can have a disastrous impact on your facility, community, employees and the environment. With countless manufacturers and transportation companies across the globe building and utilizing industrial containers everyday, there needed to be a level of regulation and oversight in the packaging and transportation industry. One of those levels of regulation comes from the United Nations.

For a drum to be UN approved and rated it needs to be built, tested and certified to contain liquid or solid dangerous materials. Only packages that are certified to have passed the UN packaging standard tests may be used to transport dangerous goods.

A few basics on UN drums and the regulations that surround them:

UN drums are tested against drop, stack, leak and pressure standards. UN performance standards are an internationally recognized system of ratings for solids and liquids.

All UN certified drums are marked with a code that indicates the physical nature of the product for which they are suited. This code always starts with the letters “UN” in a circle. This marking is permanent.

There are three dangerous goods packing groups. The first (packing group I) refers to UN Drums and barrels such as those manufactured by Skolnik. This packing group is built to the highest standard.

It is the shipper’s legal duty to select and fill packages correctly. It is also the shipper’s duty to ensure that packages are marked accordingly. Shipping container packers should check that packages are properly marked and, if they are not, should not transport them. But the responsibility of proper selection falls on the shipper.

Do you know what UN rating your materials need? Skolnik can help you understand the UN ratings and guide you to the packaging suited for your use. What’s more, Skolnik UN drums are built stronger and thicker than the industry standards require.

Overpack Salvage Drums not Recommended for Primary Shipment

June 25th, 2018 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Salvage Drum

Salvage drums have long been used as overpacks for the efficient and effective transport of damaged, defective or leaking containers. However, according to the DOT, salvage drums are NOT to be used as a secondary container, or overpack, for a primary shipment.

Rather, an overpack salvage drum should only be used for damaged, defective, leaking or non-compliant packagings that are discovered after having been placed in transportation.

In 1998, the ‘T’ Salvage drum became the United Nations’ recommended salvage packaging for international use. It is most commonly an 85 US gallon capacity. To bear the UN certification, overpack salvage drums are rigorously tested. They must be able to be dropped 1.2 meters (4 feet) on its most critical orientation without leaking and pass a 30 kPa overall Leakproofness Test. However, while they are certified to hold non-compliant packages in transport, the DOT recommends that, once overpacked in a salvage drum, a non-compliant container should be routed to a facility for disposal or re-containment. You can never be too careful.

And remember, traditional overpack drums are designed to protect non-leaking containers or to be used in a combination pack, they are not certified to hold damaged/non-compliant containers.