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Industrial Packaging for Critical Contents

Drum It Up! Steel Drum Industry News, Trends, and Issues

Posts Tagged ‘UN rated’

What Are UN Packing Groups?

November 27th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: Salvage Drum

All of our products here at Skolnik have been rigorously tested to meet every relevant safety standard required for each of their uses. One such regulation standard that containers such as our overpack salvage drums have is a UN marking, providing valuable information about the contents of the drums. While they can be a bit mystifying, we have resources to help answer questions about those markings, and once explained, most of these make sense. Right in the middle of the code there is, however, a letter designation that perhaps needs more elaboration: the X, Y, or Z of the UN Packing Group.

Each letter describes which of groups I, II and III the container is appropriate for. These groups identify the hazard level of the package, with each groups then representing three levels of danger: I is the highest, II is a medium hazard, and III is the lowest rating.Thus, the letter on the salvage drum establishes what level of protection the container provides and what products can be stored in them.

While this letter may be enough information for day to day operations, this leaves one last question still unaddressed: how does the UN determine what is low, medium, and high danger?

The answer to this is found in the very dry and technical Manual of Tests and Criteria, in which UN details their elaborate testing process for various types of materials. Throughout the graphs and charts, one can find that all explosives are assigned to group II. Or if handling flammable liquids, according to the manual, anything that has a flash point greater than 23 degrees Celsius but less than 60.5 degrees is in group III. There are specifications for substances liable to spontaneous combustion, and for ones that, when in contact with water, emit flammable gases. Multiple types of hazards are examined, quantified, and categorized according to how quickly they explode, burn, or corrode.

So, as it turns out, there is elaborate, methodical and thorough science behind these threat-level groups. These categorizations then go on to inform how the materials ought to be stored. While that’s a bit of a reassuring no-brainer, details such as these can easily be overlooked and taken for granted in the hustle and bustle of shipping logistics. Whether you’re trying to decide which Skolnik brand overpack salvage drum is most appropriate for your needs, or have used the same Skolnik brand overpack salvage drum for years, having a fuller appreciation of the container and its components can provide you with the confidence that you’re making the right choices in your business.

Keeping up with Compliance: UN Certified Packaging

March 24th, 2017 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: DOT/UN

You are probably already a safe, savvy and compliant business, but sometimes even businesses who follow UN and DOT regulations don’t fully understand them. The shipping and storage industry is heavily regulated — especially when it comes to handling hazardous materials or consumer goods such as pharmaceuticals or food and beverage. All of these rules and regulations have been put in place to protect transportation workers, the environment and the population. But, when you purchase UN certified packaging, what exactly does that mean?

The Manufacturer

Let us break it down for you. When buying a UN certified drum, the entire design of the drum, and all of its components is defined by the test samples. Each element — heads, ring, gasket, bolt, nut, plugs — must meet UN specified requirements. If even one of these components, or the design of the drum itself, doesn’t measure up, the drum is not UN compliant. At Skolnik, we

The initial onus for meeting UN standards is on the manufacturer, but once a UN certified package leaves our hands, it is up the filler to maintain compliance.

The Filler

Users cannot alter or exchange any of these components without it impacting the ability for the drum to perform as tested and certified.

If you were to purchase a UN certified drum with a nut and bolt style closure, but later swap that closure for a Leverlock, this would void the UN certification. At this stage in the container’s lifecycle, it is the fillers responsibility to adhere to UN regulations. If replacement parts are needed, fillers must make sure that they get original components form the original manufacturer that continue to meet the test criteria of that specific drum.

Make sure you always follow Skolnik’s Closure Instructions to verify a proper closure before passing the buck to your shipper.

The Shipper

Once a drum is filled, compliance with the UN certification is the responsibility of the shipper. It is up to the shipper to read the UN code and ensure the container is safely stored or shipped according to its contents.

Remember, no matter where you are in the journey of a container, non-compliance comes with a hefty fine. Fines for non-compliant shipments, of dangerous goods especially, are getting larger and more frequent. For the sake of your employees, facility and community, please keep an eye on evolving regulations and restrictions to ensure your UN certified packaging maintains compliance at every stage.

Why Use Steel Drums for Dangerous Goods?

October 20th, 2016 by Natalie Mueller

Filed under: HazMat

Steel drums are one of the most popular containers for a variety of materials — including hazardous materials and dangerous goods. Several factors have contributed to steel drums’ rise to popularity in the shipping and storage of dangerous goods, but the steel drum experts at Skolnik have found that you don’t need to dig that deep to discover the main reasons steel drums are used for dangerous goods.

salvage

  1. Steel is strong. Sure, there are plastic and paper containers, but metal is stronger. Airplanes, aircraft carriers, and trains are made of metal, not plastic or paper. Strength is important when handling and transporting classified dangerous goods — therefore, more businesses choose steel drums over fiber or plastic drums, and more UN and DOT regulations require or recommend steel containers for dangerous goods.
  2. Steel is rigorously tested. Steel drums meet the highest levels of test performance of all non-bulk packaging. Skolnik steel drums are rigorously tested to meet stringent UN and DOT certifications, but also just to meet our own high-performance standards. We design and manufacture steel drums that get the job done and then some, and we test them accordingly. Plastic and fiber drums are not tested with the same intensity and precision as steel drums.
  3. Skolnik steel drums are special. We offer a range of packaging options, we specialize in steel drums and our engineers can customize drums for our customers’ unique needs. We are a company whose pulse is to find solutions to particular packaging, shipping or transport problems. We offer a diverse range of customization options including diameters, height, metal thickness, packaging, protective coatings, closures, placement of plugs and more. And, Skolnik steel drums are manufactured thicker, heavier and stronger than the industry standard requires.

We specialize in industrial packaging for critical contents and we recommend steel as the material-of-choice for packaging, storing and transporting dangerous goods and hazardous materials.