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Archive for the ‘Skolnik Newsletter’ Category

Easy HazMat Training Options to Remain Compliant

July 30th, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: HazMat, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

More than ever before, improper or non-existent training is being viewed as the major cause of many dangerous goods incidents happening today in the US and abroad. A large percentage of the DOT‘s enforcement actions pertain to the failure of employers to provide appropriate hazardous materials training. In most cases, violations are the result of no function-specific training, or no recurrent training which is required every 3 years. We recommend that employers use outside consultants to establish and monitor the efficacy of a training program. An outside consultant can choose appropriate testing requirements, administer testing and track ongoing compliance. This includes training for new employees as well as re-training for employees that receive additional responsibilities.

While many training programs are available, Labelmaster offers face to face, classroom programs that are recognized as being of particularly high quality. Check here to learn more about these options.

For on-line training, Labelmaster also offers 9 critical courses that are essential for dangerous goods shippers and employers. These classes (https://www.labelmaster.com/shop/training) are easy to administer, can be attended from anywhere in the world, and are available 24/7.

Whether face to face or electronically, there is no reason for HazMat employers to overlook their training responsibilities.

Skolnik’s 49CFR Cheat Sheet Helps to Quickly Locate Packaging References

July 23rd, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, Skolnik Newsletter

Not sure where to begin a search for a packaging reference in 49CFR? The CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) is the Hazardous Materials shipping bible. In Title 49, there are definitions, classifications, regulations and a host of specific requirements set forth by the US DOT regarding the safe transport of hazardous materials by air, rail, water or road. Subtitle B of Chapter 1 refers to the Research and Special Programs Administration, with Subchapters A — C targeting Hazardous Materials Transportation Pipeline Safety, Oil Transportation, and Hazardous Materials Regulations. These subchapters are divided into Parts 171-180 with Subparts, Sections, Paragraphs and Subparagraphs. Part 178 addresses Hazardous Materials Packaging Specifications.

Finding a particular reference to a regulatory question can be difficult. For several years, Skolnik has been developing a CFR Cheat-Sheet of specific paragraphs that speak to common questions regarding UN (United Nations) packagings. A part of the Skolnik web site, the CFR Cheat-Sheet lists, and links, to about 50 packaging references and the exact paragraph that explains the regulatory requirement. The Cheat-Sheet primarily focuses on Section 49 of the CFR, and requirements mostly applicable to steel and plastic drums of all sizes.

Wine Wars

July 16th, 2019 by Jon Stein

Filed under: Skolnik Newsletter, Wine

In the escalating trade war that threatens the world economy, wine is a minor skirmish at most. But it has its own list of casualties — especially vineyards in the U.S., and drinkers in China with a taste for their product. Writing in the Bloomberg newsletter, “Terms of Trade”, Ryan Haar writes: “U.S. President Donald Trump has raged at Europeans for taxing American wine out of their markets. Chinese tariffs have sent the price of a Californian red soaring in Beijing. Even the apparently unrelated question of Boeing’s competition with Airbus could have fallout for wine-drinkers who, in various parts of the world, have had to get used to higher prices.” Here’s a roundup of wine-trade news:

China

China has slapped three rounds of tariffs on American wine in little more than a year, with the latest one coming into effect at the start of June, according to the Wine Institute, an advocacy group for Californian producers. That’s having a sharp impact on prices in what’s become the fastest-growing major wine market in the world. Honig Vineyard & Winery, based in Napa, California, has been exporting to China since 2007. Before the trade war escalated in 2018, “a bottle of the Cabernet would cost around $50 in our tasting room and about $70 in China,” says Stephanie Honig, director of communications and exports. Three rounds of tariffs later, the Beijing price has gone up to $170 — assuming you can find it. Honig, which exported 1,000 cases to China in 2016, says the number fell to zero last year. The wine industry in California has taken “terrific hits,” Mike Thompson, a congressman from the state, told U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer in a House hearing this month. “We are at a disadvantage when competitors are paying zero percent.”

Europe

Ryan Haar goes on to write that: “Trump isn’t at all happy about the terms of American wine trade with Europe, where the world’s biggest exporters are found — and he’s been stepping up his complaints since November. Trump’s threat to retaliate with matching U.S. tariffs also forms part of a much bigger trade argument: the one involving plane-makers Boeing and Airbus. As the dispute escalates, both the U.S. and Europe have drawn up lists of goods that they’ll target with tariffs, and wine is on the American version.” “The only linkage alcohol has with planes is that it’s served on planes,” said Robert Tobiassen, President of the National Association of Beverage Importers. “This injures consumers.”

Here at Skolnik Industries, we buy domestic carbon and stainless steel, and carefully monitor the growing impact of the tariffs. Note that our stainless steel wine barrels are reusable, easy to clean, and recyclable at the end of their service life. Check out the full line of our Stainless Steel Wine Drums here.

US DOT Embraces Auto Driving

June 25th, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: DOT/UN, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

The United States surface transportation system provides tremendous mobility benefits, including widespread access to jobs, goods, and services. It also connects many remote regions of the country to the larger economy. These benefits, however, come with significant safety challenges, as motor vehicle crashes remain a leading cause of death, with an estimated 37,133 lives lost on U.S. roads in 2017. Traditional safety programs and policies have made road travel significantly safer than in the past, but there is much room to improve traffic fatality and injury rates.

The U.S. Department of Transportation is taking active steps to prepare for the future by engaging with new technologies to ensure safety without hampering innovation. With the release of Automated Driving Systems 2.0: A Vision for Safety, the Department provided voluntary guidance to industry, as well as technical assistance and best practices to States, offering a path forward for the safe testing and integration of automated driving systems. The Department also bolstered its engagement with the automotive industry, technology companies, ii PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE OF TRANSPORTATION and other key transportation stakeholders and innovators to continue to develop a policy framework that facilitates the safe integration of this technology into our transportation systems. Preparing for the Future of Transportation: Automated Vehicles 3.0 (AV 3.0) is another milestone in the Department’s development of a flexible, responsible approach to a framework for multimodal automation. It introduces guiding principles and describes the Department’s strategy to address existing barriers to safety innovation and progress. It also communicates the Department’s agenda to the public and stakeholders on important policy issues, and identifies opportunities for cross-modal collaboration.

Read the full article here