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Archive for the ‘Skolnik Newsletter’ Category

“Hey Alexa, will you pour me a glass of Riesling?”

October 15th, 2019 by Jon Stein

Filed under: Skolnik Newsletter, Wine

In a recent Wine Advisor report, details emerged about Travel Oregon launching an innovative voice search game using Amazon’s Alexa device. Why Oregon? Because Oregon is home to more than 760 wineries and 19 distinct growing areas, making it one of the largest wine-grape-producing states in the nation. It’s tough for even the biggest Oregon wine aficionados to know everything about Oregon wine. That’s why Travel Oregon created the new “Oregon Wine Quiz” for Alexa users to test their wine knowledge. Whether you’re a novice or a connoisseur, the quiz highlights some of the undiscovered facts about the Oregon wine landscape and tells the deeper story of Oregon wine. It’s estimated that by 2020, 50% of all searches will be voice searches. Currently 17% of American households have a smart speaker installed. By 2022, this number is anticipated to increase to 66%. The shift to voice search has already begun. The “Oregon Wine Quiz” is a way for Travel Oregon to integrate tourism marketing and voice search and stay ahead in the ever-changing media landscape.

“We need to keep evolving and expanding our content platforms if we‘re going to remain relevant to our target audience,” said Mo Sherifdeen, Global Integrated Marketing Director at Travel Oregon. “We’re thrilled to be the first tourism agency in the country to experiment with distributing content through voice search. But more importantly, we’re excited to give wine enthusiasts another way to learn about Oregon wines before they head out to wine country this fall.”

To activate the quiz, simply ask Alexa to “play the Oregon wine quiz.” Users will then be asked a series of questions about Oregon wine. Depending on the answers, users will unlock one of four podcasts, featuring interviews and storytelling from some of Oregon’s most prominent wine industry professionals, including: Travel Southern Oregon, Abacela, Brooks Winery Troon Vineyards, Tuality Healthcare and Willamette Valley Vineyards.

The topics covered include: community winemaking, The Applegate Valley Wine Trail, and sustainable winemaking. This Alexa application was built by Portland-based agency, Sparkloft Media with content support from the Oregon Wine Board. Are you ready to take your Oregon wine knowledge to the next level? Take the quiz today. And, no, Alexa can’t pour you a glass of Oregon Riesling yet, but here at Skolnik Industries, you can ask us about our stainless steel wine barrels. They are reusable, easy to clean, and recyclable at the end of their service life. Check out the full line of our Stainless Steel Wine Drums here.

Carriers Fine Shippers for Undeclared Hazardous Cargo

September 24th, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: HazMat, Safety, Skolnik Newsletter

A quarter of all liner fires reported to the Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) relate to mis-declared cargo, particularly hazardous materials. It is an age-old problem that has blighted shipping for too long, rogue shippers willfully breaking the rules to avoid freight rate and insurance premiums on dangerous goods, or committing customs fraud by declaring high value goods as more common items. The invention of the steel container made it even easier to conceal such fraudulent activity, leaving shipping lines with an uphill challenge to combat it.

With the number of container fires rapidly escalating, a few carriers recently announced that they would levy penalties on shippers for mis-declaring cargoes. These fires come at great expense to the carriers and put all on-board cargo at risk, as well as the integrity of the ship. Hapag-Lloyd, which last year shipped nearly half a million dangerous goods, effective September 15, 2019, fine shippers $15,000 for undeclared or mis-declared hazardous cargo. HMM will fine the same amount, while Evergreen announced a penalty of $35,000.

While more carriers are likely to follow the lead, the question of will the threat of financial punishment help to correct the behavior of the less willfully negligent shippers. It is unlikely to change the attitude of any rogue shipper who will still bet on evading the proper shipping regulations. It is hoped that most law-abiding shippers will welcome any measure that will help reduce the risk of their cargo being delayed or destroyed by the irresponsible action of others.

Labelmaster’s DGS draws nearly 300!

September 17th, 2019 by Howard Skolnik

Filed under: HazMat, Industry News, Skolnik Newsletter

Last week (September 4-6, 2019) at the Sheraton Grand in Chicago, Labelmaster’s 14th Annual Dangerous Goods Symposium (DGS) rocked!. Known as the preeminent conference of dangerous goods trainers, shippers, packagers, manufacturers as well as Federal Regulators, the 2019 Symposium broke the attendance record! A gathering of the most prominent industry leaders and presenters provided insights and practical advice to help navigate the most common, and many complex, DG issues. The agenda included a well-rounded list of relevant topics, including:

  • Creating a Culture of Safety
  • Domestic & International Regulatory Updates
  • Virtual Reality in Training
  • Drone Delivery
  • Carrier Variations
  • Lithium Battery Recycling and Regulations

Some of the the speakers and workship leaders included Peter Mackay of Hazardous Cargo Bulletin, Air Canada’s David Bolton, Nick Carlone of Cargo Publications, Mike Hoysler of FedEx, Geoff Leach of The Dangerous Goods Office LTD, Tim Rogers from UPS, Steven Webb of PHMSA and Pete Wagner of Purolator. Most memorable was Vinnie Desiderio from USPS who conducted a live telephone interview with his mother, a typical shipper who would benefit from hazmat training!

The Symposium highlight was a social night of dueling pianos at Howl at the Moon.

Thank you to everyone at Labelmaster for putting forth a tremendous effort to make DGS-14 a valued global event!

“Terroir…Is that a dog?”

September 11th, 2019 by Jon Stein

Filed under: Skolnik Newsletter, Wine

Writing for Wine News in “The Decanter” Chris Mercer reports that: “From planet ‘Sauternes’ to those cute ‘terroir’ dogs, a new survey in the UK suggests Britons have room for improvement in their wine knowledge – but many say they are keen to learn. Wine experts have grappled with a definition of ‘terroir’ for decades, but more than one in four Britons surveyed thought that it referred to a small breed of dog, according to results published this week.”

The correct definition of terroir is, the complete natural environment in which a particular wine is produced, including factors such as soil, topography, and climate. Chris Mercer further reports that; “While 34% did correctly connect ‘terroir’ to wine, another 30% of respondents believed it was a type of French horror film.” Their answers were part of a survey of 2,000 people commissioned by the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) ahead of its upcoming Wine Education Week, which runs globally from September 9th to the 15th.

Perhaps my favorite detail of the survey was that there was also confusion about Bordeaux’s premier sweet wines. Mercer writes that: “Seven percent of people said that Sauternes was a planet, while one in five thought it was a beach resort and 29% argued that it was a type of orange.” And he goes on to observe that: “When it comes to spotting a corked wine, 37% of people thought it meant broken pieces of cork in the bottle and 7% thought it was a term for being drunk.” However, 51% of people said they wanted to learn more about wine, reflecting a separate survey recently that saw wine beat beer, cider and spirits as the UK’s favorite drink. When it comes to food, 28% of those surveyed said they had successfully paired specific wines with certain dishes. However, 55% said that they wouldn’t know where to start with wine and food pairing. And 17% of respondents said that they had been ‘traumatized by snooty wine waiters’, said WSET. The top reason for choosing a wine was “I had drunk it before and loved it,” with 34% choosing this description — closely followed by 33% admitting they choose a wine based on an “attractive label.”

Speaking of attractive, here at Skolnik Industries, you can’t miss noticing our stainless steel wine barrels. They are reusable, easy to clean, and recyclable at the end of their service life. Check out the full line of our Stainless Steel Wine Drums here.